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Bute, John Crichton-Stuart, 3rd marquis of

Bute, John Crichton-Stuart, 3rd marquis of (1847–1900). Philanthropist and scholar. Bute inherited the title and large estates at the age of 6 months. After education at Harrow and Christ Church, Oxford, he converted to the catholic church. Much of his time was devoted to the development of Cardiff docks and to the family estates in Glamorgan. He was twice mayor of Cardiff and president of the University College. In Scotland, he was a benefactor of Glasgow and St Andrews universities, and took a keen interest in Scottish history, on which he published. From 1892 to 1898 he was rector of St Andrews. A retiring disposition prevented him taking a prominent political role, but he is a good example of a late Victorian nobleman dedicated to university and municipal matters. The Daily Chronicle wrote, on his death, that ‘there is probably no similar estate in the country where an immense commercial empire has been fostered on one man's property’.

J. A. Cannon

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