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Arran, James Hamilton, 2nd earl of

Arran, James Hamilton, 2nd earl of [S] (c.1517–75). Arran was a great-grandson of James II of Scotland and succeeded to the earldom in 1529. On the death of James V in 1542 he was heir presumptive to the Scottish throne, Mary being a tiny infant. From 1543 he was regent on her behalf. At first pro-English and anxious for a marriage between Mary and Edward VI, when this fell through and war followed, he abjured protestantism and moved towards the French interest. When Mary was sent to be brought up in France, Arran was created duke of Chatelherault. In 1554 he gave up the regency to Mary of Guise, though he retained hopes of a marriage between Queen Mary and his own son. He opposed the Darnley marriage and was obliged to leave the kingdom between 1565 and 1569. On his return, he supported the queen's party. Even allowing for the vicissitudes of Scottish politics, his course seems vacillating and uncertain.

J. A. Cannon

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