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emerald

emerald, the green variety of beryl, of which aquamarine is the blue variety. Chemically, it is a beryllium-aluminum silicate whose color is due to small quantities of chromium compounds. The emerald was highly esteemed in antiquity; the stones were used for ornaments in early Egypt where some of the first emeralds were mined. The finest emeralds are found in South America in Colombia, where they have been mined for over 400 years. The gem was a favorite in pre-Columbian Mexico and Peru, where it was cut in intricate designs. The treasure taken back to Spain by early explorers included emeralds. Good emeralds are the most highly valued of gem stones. Zambia and Brazil are also significant sources of the natural stones. Synthetic emeralds are also manufactured in Germany, France, and the United States. The Oriental emerald, a different gem, is the transparent green variety of corundum.

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"emerald." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"emerald." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/emerald

"emerald." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved June 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/emerald

Emerald

Emerald

One of the most highly esteemed precious stones, known to ancient Egyptians, Hindus, Greeks, and Romans. In India emeralds were used to adorn images in temples, and Moslems used emeralds as amulets, inscribed with verses from the Koran. Emeralds were believed to change color when surrounded by deception and treachery. They were also believed to be preservatives against decay, dysentery, and the bites of venomous creatures and to promote easy childbirth. In ancient Rome the emperor Nero was said to have had an unusually large emerald that he used for viewing gladiatorial contests. Presumably he was shortsighted and used it as a lens.

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"Emerald." Encyclopedia of Occultism and Parapsychology. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Emerald." Encyclopedia of Occultism and Parapsychology. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/emerald

"Emerald." Encyclopedia of Occultism and Parapsychology. . Retrieved June 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/emerald

emerald

emerald this bright green precious stone is a type of brilliant green. In heraldry, emerald is the name given to the tincture vert in the fanciful blazon of arms of peers. Recorded from Middle English, the word comes via Old French and Latin from Greek (s)maragdos from Hebrew bāreqeṯ ‘emerald’, from bāraq ‘flash, sparkle’.
Emerald Isle a name for Ireland, perhaps from the prevailing green of its countryside; first recorded in the nationalist poem Erin (1795) by William Drennan (1754–1820).

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"emerald." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"emerald." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/emerald

"emerald." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved June 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/emerald

emerald

em·er·ald / ˈem(ə)rəld/ • n. 1. a bright green precious stone consisting of a chromium-rich variety of beryl. 2. a bright green color like that of an emerald. • adj. bright green in color.

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"emerald." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"emerald." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/emerald-1

"emerald." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved June 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/emerald-1

emerald

emerald XIII. ME. emeraude — OF. e(s)meraude (mod. émeraude) = It. smeraldo, Sp. esmeralda :- Rom. *smaralda, -o, alteration of L. smaragdus — Gr. smáragdos. The sp. with -ld is prob. due to It. or Sp. influence in XVI.

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"emerald." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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emerald

emerald Variety of beryl, highly valued as a gemstone. The colour varies from light to dark green due to the presence of small amounts of chromium.

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"emerald." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"emerald." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/emerald

"emerald." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved June 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/emerald

emerald

emerald See BERYL.

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"emerald." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"emerald." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/emerald

"emerald." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Retrieved June 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/emerald

emerald

emerald •Roald • unlabelled (US unlabeled) •ribald • untroubled • unruffled •newfangled • unwrinkled •bespectacled •untrammelled (US untrammeled) •Arnold • Reginald •Donald, Macdonald, Ronald •unexampled • unprincipled •uncrumpled • Harold •Fitzgerald, Gerald, herald •emerald • embattled • unmetalled •untitled • disgruntled •untravelled (US untraveled) •unrivalled (US unrivaled) • Tynwald •Ostwald • Oswald • sozzled • world •dreamworld • underworld •afterworld • netherworld

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"emerald." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"emerald." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/emerald-0

"emerald." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved June 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/emerald-0