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elevation

el·e·va·tion / ˌeləˈvāshən/ • n. 1. the action or fact of elevating or being elevated: her sudden elevation to the cabinet. ∎  augmentation of or increase in the amount or level of something: ∎  (in a Christian Mass) the raising of the consecrated elements for adoration. 2. height above a given level, esp. sea level: a network of microclimates created by sharp differences in elevation a total elevation gain of 3,995 feet. ∎  a high place or position: most early plantation development was at the higher elevations. ∎  the angle of something with the horizontal, esp. of a gun or of the direction of a celestial object. ∎  Ballet the ability of a dancer to attain height in jumps. 3. a particular side of a building: a burglar alarm was prominently displayed on the front elevation. ∎  a drawing of the front, side, or back of a house or other building: a set of plans and elevations. DERIVATIVES: el·e·va·tion·al adj.

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"elevation." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"elevation." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/elevation-0

"elevation." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved October 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/elevation-0

elevation

elevation, vertical distance from a datum plane, usually mean sea level to a point above the earth. Often used synonymously with altitude, elevation is the height on the earth's surface and altitude, the height in space above the surface. The elevation of a feature is calculated through such surveying techniques as trigonometric triangulation and aerial photogrammetry. Elevation is represented by using contours of equal elevation lines, three-dimensional computer graphics representation, or molded three-dimensional plastic models.

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"elevation." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"elevation." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/elevation

"elevation." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved October 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/elevation

elevation

elevation.
1. Accurate geometrical projection, drawn to scale, of a building's façade or any other visible external or internal part on a plane vertical (at a right angle) to the horizon.

2. Any external façade.

Bibliography

Fraser Reekie (1946)

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"elevation." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"elevation." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/elevation

"elevation." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Retrieved October 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/elevation

Elevation

Elevation. The lifting up of the elements of the eucharist by the celebrant. The purpose is both to symbolize their offering to God and to focus the devotion of the congregation.

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"Elevation." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Elevation." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/elevation

"Elevation." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Retrieved October 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/elevation

elevation

elevation in the Christian Church, the raising of the consecrated elements for adoration at Mass.

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"elevation." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"elevation." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/elevation

"elevation." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved October 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/elevation