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pollarding

pollarding A system of wood management in which the main stem of a tree, usually a young one, is cut off about 2 m above ground level, thus favouring the development of lateral branches. With repeated pollarding a slightly swollen pollard boll develops in the main stem immediately beneath the lateral branches. Frequent pollarding, commonly seen in willows (Salix species), favours many relatively thin-stemmed lateral branches. Pollarding rather less frequently was the traditional management practice associated with wood-pastures, where grazing pressure made coppicing, the more usual method for generating new growth, impracticable. Wood-pastures were particularly characteristic of slower-growing upland woodlands, and woodlands on infertile soils. Pollarding was also used to encourage particular sizes and shapes of timber needed for structural purposes. In Britain, the Ancient and Ornamental Woodlands of the New Forest include classic relict wood-pastures with pollarded beeches and oaks.

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"pollarding." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"pollarding." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 14, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pollarding-0

"pollarding." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Retrieved December 14, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pollarding-0

pollarding

pollarding A system of management in which the main stem of a (usually young) tree is severed about 2 m above ground level, favouring the development of lateral branches. Repeated pollarding leads to the formation of a slightly swollen boll in the main stem immediately below the lateral branches and frequent pollarding, common with willows (Salix species), produces many thin-stemmed lateral branches. Less frequent pollarding was a traditional management practice in wood-pastures, where grazing pressure made coppicing impracticable. Pollarded wood-pastures were characteristic of slower-growing woodlands on infertile soils or in upland areas, and pollarding was also used to produce particular sizes and shapes of timber needed for structural uses. In Britain, the ancient and ornamental woodlands of the New Forest include classic relict wood-pastures containing pollarded beeches and oaks.

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"pollarding." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"pollarding." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 14, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pollarding

"pollarding." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Retrieved December 14, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pollarding