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coppice

coppice
1. A traditional European method of woodland management and wood production, in which shoots are allowed to grow up from the base of a felled tree. Trees are felled in a rotation, commonly of 12–15 years. A coppice may be large, in which case trees, usually ash (Fraxinus) or maple (Acer), are cut, leaving a massive stool from which up to 10 trunks arise; or small, in which case trees, usually hazel (Corylus), hawthorn (Crataegus), or willow (Salix), are cut to leave small, underground stools producing many short stems. The system provides a continuous supply of timber for fuel, fencing, etc., but not structural timber. In Britain, coppicing has largely been abandoned now, except for conservation purposes, since high labour costs and alternative fuels and materials render the practice unprofitable.

2. The smaller trees and bushes that regenerate from cut stumps and occasionally (e.g. in Ulmus species) from root suckering.

3. An area of land in which underwood and timber is or was grown.

4. (copse) Any type of wood in which the shrub layer predominates and is periodically coppiced.

5. The action of cutting coppice.

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"coppice." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"coppice." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/coppice-0

"coppice." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Retrieved June 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/coppice-0

coppice

coppice
1. A traditional European method of woodland management and wood production, in which shoots are allowed to grow up from the base of a felled tree. Trees are felled in a rotation, commonly of 12–15 years. A coppice may be large, in which case trees, usually ash (Fraxinus) or maple (Acer), are cut, leaving a massive stool from which up to 10 trunks arise; or small, in which case trees, usually hazel (Corylus), hawthorn (Crataegus), or willow (Salix), are cut to leave small, underground stools producing many short stems. The system provides a continuous supply of timber for fuel, fencing, etc., but not structural timber. In Britain, coppicing is largely abandoned now, except for conservation purposes, since high labour costs and alternative fuels and materials render the practice unprofitable.

2. The smaller trees and bushes that regenerate from cut stumps and occasionally (e.g. in Ulmus species) from root suckering.

3. An area of land in which underwood and timber is or was grown.

4. (copse) Any type of wood in which the shrub layer predominates and is periodically coppiced.

5. The action of cutting coppice.

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"coppice." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"coppice." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/coppice

"coppice." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Retrieved June 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/coppice

coppice

cop·pice / ˈkäpəs/ chiefly Brit. • n. an area of woodland in which the trees or shrubs are, or formerly were, periodically cut back to ground level to stimulate growth and provide firewood or timber. • v. [tr.] cut back (a tree or shrub) to ground level periodically to stimulate growth: [as adj.] (coppiced) coppiced timber.

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"coppice." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"coppice." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/coppice-0

"coppice." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved June 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/coppice-0

coppice

coppice XIV (cop(e)ys). — OF. copeïz :- Rom. *colpātīcium, f. *colpāt-, pp. stem of *colpāre cut (F. couper; see COPE 2).

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"coppice." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"coppice." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/coppice-1

"coppice." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved June 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/coppice-1

moot

moot See coppice stump.

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"moot." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"moot." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/moot

"moot." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Retrieved June 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/moot

moot

moot See COPPICE STUMP.

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"moot." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"moot." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/moot-0

"moot." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Retrieved June 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/moot-0

coppice

coppiceanise, Janice •Daphnis • Agnes •harness, Kiwanis •Dennis, Ennis, Glenys, menace, tennis, Venicefeyness, gayness, greyness (US grayness) •finis, penis •Glynis, Innes, pinnace •Widnes • bigness • lychnis • illness •dimness • hipness •fitness, witness •Erinys • iciness •dryness, flyness, shyness, slyness, wryness •cornice •Adonis, Clones, Issigonis •coyness •Eunice, TunisBernice, furnace •Thespis • precipice • coppice • hospice •auspice • Serapis

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"coppice." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"coppice." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/coppice

"coppice." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved June 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/coppice