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high forest

high forest A forest comprising trees of all ages from which it is planned to obtain a crop of timber. The term does not apply to underwood or coppice. It applies equally whether the trees were planted by humans, were self-sown, or were derived from coppice stools. The trunks of the trees remain unbranched up to considerable heights, and grow in strong competition with each other for light. As is implied by this, the density of trees is relatively high.

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"high forest." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"high forest." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/high-forest-0

"high forest." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Retrieved October 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/high-forest-0

high forest

high forest A forester's term describing a natural forest, as opposed to a plantation, usually comprising trees of all ages, as opposed to being even-aged. The term does not apply to underwood or coppice and applies equally whether the trees were self-sown or derived from coppice stools.

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"high forest." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"high forest." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/high-forest

"high forest." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Retrieved October 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/high-forest