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clay minerals

clay minerals Members of the phyllosilicates (sheet silicates) with related chemistry, all are hydrous aluminium silicates with layered structure; layers of [SiO4] tetrahedra of composition [Si4O10]4− are joined to Al-O layers (gibbsite-type layers) or (Mg,Fe)-O layers (brucite-type layers). 1:1 sheet silicates have one Si-O layer coupled to one brucite or gibbsite layer and include the serpentine group and the kaolinite or kandite group of clays; 2:1 sheet silicates have two Si-O layers joined to one brucite or gibbsite layer and include the smectite and illite groups of clays, bentonite and montmorillonite, as well as talc and the mica group; 2:2 sheet silicates have two Si-O layers joined to two brucite or gibbsite layers and include the chlorite group. It is difficult to distinguish clay minerals by hand or under the microscope, so sophisticated techniques of X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to determine the precise clay mineral under investigation.

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"clay minerals." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 11 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"clay minerals." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 11, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/clay-minerals

"clay minerals." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Retrieved December 11, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/clay-minerals

clay mineral

clay mineral A member of a group of chemically related hydrous aluminium silicates, which generally occur either as very small platy or fibrous crystals. They have a layered structure and the ability to take up and lose water readily. It is difficult to distinguish various clay minerals, and therefore geologists employ sophisticated techniques (e.g. X-ray diffraction analysis and electron microscopy). The most important clay minerals belong to the kaolinite, hydrous mica, smectite, chlorite, vermiculite, and talc groups.

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"clay mineral." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. 11 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"clay mineral." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 11, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/clay-mineral

"clay mineral." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Retrieved December 11, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/clay-mineral

clay mineral

clay mineral A member of a group of chemically related hydrous aluminium silicates, which generally occur either as very small platy or fibrous crystals. They have a layered structure and the ability to take up and lose water readily. It is difficult to distinguish various clay minerals, and therefore geologists employ sophisticated techniques (e.g. X-ray diffraction analysis and electron microscopy). The most important clay minerals belong to the kaolinite, hydrous mica, smectite, chlorite, vermiculite, and tale groups.

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"clay mineral." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 11 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"clay mineral." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 11, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/clay-mineral-0

"clay mineral." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Retrieved December 11, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/clay-mineral-0