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young

young young folks think old folks to be fools, but old folks know young folks to be fools proverbial saying, late 16th century, asserting the value of the experience of life which comes with age over youth and inexperience.
a young man married is a young man marred proverbial saying, late 16th century, often used as an argument against marrying too young.
young men may die, but old men must die proverbial saying, mid 16th century, meaning that death is inevitable for all, and can at best be postponed until old age.
Young Pretender a name for Charles Edward Stuart (1720–80), as son of the Old Pretender; the name is first recorded from 1745 (the year of the second Jacobite Rising).
young saint, old devil proverbial saying, early 15th century; meaning that unnaturally good and moral behaviour at an early age is likely to change in later life.
Young Turk a member of a revolutionary party in the Ottoman Empire who carried out the revolution of 1908 and deposed the sultan Abdul Hamid II; in extended usage, a young person eager for radical change to the established order.

See also angry young man, those whom the gods love die young, the good die young, hang a thief when he's young, you cannot put an old head on young shoulders.

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"young." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"young." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 14, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/young

"young." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved December 14, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/young

young

young / ng/ • adj. (young·er , young·est ) having lived or existed for only a short time: a young girl| [as pl. n.] (the young) the young are amazingly resilient. ∎  not as old as the norm or as would be expected: more people were dying young. ∎  relating to, characteristic of, or consisting of young people: young love the Young Communist League. ∎  immature or inexperienced: she's very young for her age. ∎  having the qualities popularly associated with young people, such as enthusiasm and optimism: all those who are young at heart. ∎  (the Younger) used to denote the younger of two people of the same name: Pitt the Younger. ∎  (younger) Scot. denoting the heir of a landed commoner: Hugh Magnus Macleod, younger of Macleod. • n. [treated as pl.] offspring, esp. of an animal before or soon after birth: this species carries its young. PHRASES: with young (of an animal) pregnant.DERIVATIVES: young·ish / ˈyəngish/ adj.

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"young." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"young." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 14, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/young-1

"young." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved December 14, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/young-1

young

young OE. ġ(e)ong, ġung, later iung = OS. jung (Du. jong), OHG. junc (G. jung), ON. ungr, Goth. juggs :- Gmc. *juŋʒaz, contr. of juwuŋʒaz :- IE. *juwṇk̂ós, repr. by Skr. yuvaśá- youthful, L. juvencus young bull, W. ieuanc, OIr. ōac, ōc young, extension of *juwen-, *jū̆n-, repr. directly by Skr. yúvan-, L. juvenis young.
Hence youngling young person. OE. ġeongling = OS. jungling, OHG. jungaling, ON. ynglingr; see -LING1. youngster young person. XVI; see -STER.

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"young." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"young." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 14, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/young-2

"young." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved December 14, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/young-2

young

youngamong, bung, clung, dung, flung, hung, lung, outflung, rung, shantung, slung, sprung, strung, stung, sung, swung, tongue, underslung, wrung, young •aqualung • hamstrung • ox tongue

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"young." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"young." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 14, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/young-0

"young." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved December 14, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/young-0