pectin
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pectin

pectin Plant tissues contain hemicelluloses (chemically polymers of galacturonic acid) known as protopectins which cement the cell walls together. As fruit ripens, there is maximum protopectin present; thereafter it breaks down to pectin, pectinic acid, and, finally, pectic acid, and the fruit softens as the adhesive between the cells breaks down.

Pectin is the setting agent in jam; it forms a gel with sugar under acid conditions. Soft fruits, such as strawberry, raspberry, and cherry, are low in pectin; plums, apples, and oranges are rich. Apple pulp and orange pith are the commercial sources of pectin. Added to jams, confectionery, chocolate, and ice cream as an emulsifier and stabilizer instead of agar; used in making jellies, and as an anti‐staling agent in cakes. Included in non‐starch polysaccharides.

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DAVID A. BENDER. "pectin." A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition. 2005. Encyclopedia.com. 26 Sep. 2016 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

DAVID A. BENDER. "pectin." A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition. 2005. Encyclopedia.com. (September 26, 2016). http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1O39-pectin.html

DAVID A. BENDER. "pectin." A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition. 2005. Retrieved September 26, 2016 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1O39-pectin.html

pectin

pectin, any of a group of white, amorphous, complex carbohydrates that occur in ripe fruits and certain vegetables. Fruits rich in pectin are the peach, apple, currant, and plum. Protopectin, present in unripe fruits, is converted to pectin as the fruit ripens. Pectin forms a colloidal solution in water and gels on cooling. When fruits are cooked with the correct amount of sugar, and when the acidity is optimum and the amount of pectin present is sufficient, jams and jellies can be made. In overripe fruits, the pectin becomes pectic acid, which does not form jelly with sugar solutions. Commercial preparations of pectin are available for jelly making. An indigestible, soluble fiber, pectin is a general intestinal regulator that is used in many medicinal preparations, especially as an antidiarrhea agent.

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"pectin." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. 2016. Encyclopedia.com. 26 Sep. 2016 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"pectin." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. 2016. Encyclopedia.com. (September 26, 2016). http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1E1-pectin.html

"pectin." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. 2016. Retrieved September 26, 2016 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1E1-pectin.html

pectin

pectin One of a group of homopolysac charides that contain a variety of monosaccharides, but are especially rich in galacturonic acid. They form a kind of cement, so contributing to the structure of plant cell walls, being particularly abundant in young primary walls and fruits.

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MICHAEL ALLABY. "pectin." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. 1998. Encyclopedia.com. 26 Sep. 2016 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

MICHAEL ALLABY. "pectin." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. 1998. Encyclopedia.com. (September 26, 2016). http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1O7-pectin.html

MICHAEL ALLABY. "pectin." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. 1998. Retrieved September 26, 2016 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1O7-pectin.html

pectin

pec·tin / ˈpektin/ • n. a soluble gelatinous polysaccharide that is present in ripe fruits and is extracted for use as a setting agent in jams and jellies. DERIVATIVES: pec·tic / ˈpektik/ adj.

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"pectin." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. 2009. Encyclopedia.com. 26 Sep. 2016 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"pectin." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. 2009. Encyclopedia.com. (September 26, 2016). http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1O999-pectin.html

"pectin." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. 2009. Retrieved September 26, 2016 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1O999-pectin.html

pectin

pectin Water-soluble polysaccharide found in the cell walls and intercellular tissue of certain ripe fruits or vegetables. When fruit is cooked, it yields a gel that is the basis of jellies and jams.

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"pectin." World Encyclopedia. 2005. Encyclopedia.com. 26 Sep. 2016 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"pectin." World Encyclopedia. 2005. Encyclopedia.com. (September 26, 2016). http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1O142-pectin.html

"pectin." World Encyclopedia. 2005. Retrieved September 26, 2016 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1O142-pectin.html

pectin

pectin A type of pectic substance. It is used in making jam as it forms a gel with sucrose.

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"pectin." A Dictionary of Biology. 2004. Encyclopedia.com. 26 Sep. 2016 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"pectin." A Dictionary of Biology. 2004. Encyclopedia.com. (September 26, 2016). http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1O6-pectin.html

"pectin." A Dictionary of Biology. 2004. Retrieved September 26, 2016 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1O6-pectin.html

pectin

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"pectin." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. 2007. Encyclopedia.com. 26 Sep. 2016 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"pectin." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. 2007. Encyclopedia.com. (September 26, 2016). http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1O233-pectin.html

"pectin." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. 2007. Retrieved September 26, 2016 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1O233-pectin.html

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