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Athletics

26. Athletics

See also 2. ACROBATICS ; 55. BOXING ; 176. GAMES ; 347. RECREATION .

aerobics
a form of physical activity characterized by strenuous exercise of many muscle groups and intended to increase muscle tone and cardiovascular fitness. aerobic, adj.
agonist
one who contends for a prize in public games. agonistic, agonistical, adj.
agonistics
the art of athletic combat or contests in public games.
aquatics
the art and exercise of water sports.
athleticism
1. an active interest in sports.
2. an obsessive participation in physical activity. athletic, adj.
calisthenics
the science, art, or practice of bodily exercises intended to promote strength, health, and grace of movement. calisthenic, calisthenical, adj.
contortionist
a person who performs gymnastic feats involving distorted postures. contortionistic, adj.
decathlon
an athletic contest in which the contestants compete for points awarded for performances in ten different track and field events, the winner being the one with the highest aggregate score. The events include 100-meter, 400-meter, and 1500-meter runs, 110-meter high hurdles, long jump, high jump, pole vault, shot-put, javelin throw, and discus throw. Cf. heptathlon, pentathlon, triathlon .
discobolus
1. a discus thrower.
2. cap., italics. the famous 5th-century B.C. statue by Myron of a discus thrower.
gymnasiast
a gymnast. See also 240. LEARNING .
gymnast
a person who is involved in or skilled in the art of gymnastics.
gymnastics
1. regimented exercises performed on floor mats and on certain specialized equipment that entail the skills of tumbling and balancing and that are intended to display flexibility, grace, and strength.
2. physical or athletic exercises; calisthenics. gymnastic, adj.
heptathlon
an athletic competition in which contestants compete for points awarded for performances in seven different track and field events, the winner being the one with the highest aggregate score. The competition, usually for women, consists of 100-meter and 800-meter runs, 100-meter hurdles, high jump, long jump, javelin throw, and shot-put. Cf. decathlon, pentathlon, triathlon.
isometrics
a form of physical exercise in which a set of muscles is tensed briefly, either in opposition to another set or against a solid surface. Cf. isotonics. isometric, adj.
isotonics
muscular exercise using free weights or fixed devices to simulate resistance of weight. Cf. isometrics . isotonic, adj.
lampadedromy
Ancient Greece. a race in honor of Prometheus in which the contestants ran bearing lit torches, the winner being the first to finish with his torch still lit. Also called lampadrome, lampadephoria .
lampadist
a contestant in a lampadedromy. Also called lampadephore, lampadophoros .
natation
the act or art of swimming or floating on water. natatory, natatorial, adj.
natator
a swimmer.
natatorium
a swimming pool, particularly an indoor facility.
palaestra, palestra
Ancient Greece. a public place for athletics or wrestling. palaestric, palestric, adj.
pancratiast
a person skilled in the art of boxing or wrestling. pancratiastic, adj.
pentathlon
1. Track and Field, an athletic contest in which the contestants compete for points awarded for performances in five different track and field contests, the winner being the one with the highest aggregate score. The events include, for women, an 800-meter run, 100-meter hurdles, high jump, long jump, and shot-put; for men, 200-meter and 1500-meter runs, long jump, javelin throw, and discus throw.
2. Olympic Games. Usually, modern pentathlon an athletic contest in which the contestants compete for points awarded for performances in five events: fencing, horseback riding, pistol shooting, cross-country running, and swimming.
quinquennalia
Ancient Rome. public games that took place every five years.
titlist
a champion or one who holds a title.
trampolinist
a person who performs feats of tumbling using a trampoline as a springboard. Also trampoliner . trampoline, n.
triathlon
an intense aerobic endurance competition, typically, in its longest form, consisting of a 2.4-mile ocean swim, a 112-mile bicycle ride, and a 26.2-mile marathon run, the winner being the one to finish all three events in the least time.

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athletics

athletics covers a large and increasing number of events, including sprints, marathons, discus, pole-vaulting, shot-putting, high and long jump, pentathlon, and triple jump. Running races, especially for wagers, have always been common but the first organized meeting in Britain seems to have been held at the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, in 1849. The supervising body in Britain is the Amateur Athletic Association and world-wide the International Amateur Athletics Federation (IAAF), whose Olympics Organizing Committee is responsible for the Olympic Games. The IAAF has been much exercised in recent years by the problem of drug use, which can dramatically improve performances, and a number of competitors have been disqualified. In Scotland there is a strong tradition of professional athletics. The Powderhall Sprint was first run in Edinburgh in 1870 and professional meetings continue to be held, usually in the Meadowbank stadium.

J. A. Cannon

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athletics

athletics (track and field) Composite sport that includes running and hurdling events on the track, jumping and throwing field events, cross-country and long-distance road running and walking. The first ancient Greek Olympic Games (held in 775 bc) featured many athletics events. The first modern Olympic Games were held at Athens in 1896. The world's governing body, the International Amateur Athletic Federation (IAAF), was established in 1912, and the sport maintained its amateur status. In the late 20th century, commercial sponsorship and media coverage ended top flight amateurism and introduced professional grand prix events.

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athletics

athletics Original, and still major, British usage: competitive running or walking (‘track athletics’), jumping or throwing (‘field athletics’) — increasingly replaced, especially amongst practitioners, by the phrase ‘track and field’. More commonly in US and elsewhere: active sport generally.

Neil C. Spurway

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athletics

ath·let·ics / a[unvoicedth]ˈletiks/ • pl. n. [usu. treated as sing.] physical sports and games of any kind.

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"athletics." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved June 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/athletics