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pork

pork, flesh of swine prepared as food, one of the principal commodities of the meatpacking industry. Pork has long been a staple food in most of the world, although religious taboos have limited its use, especially among Jews and Muslims. It is sold either as fresh meat or as ham, bacon, sausage, lard, or a variety of other products. The fresh pork and the choicest cured products are taken from smooth carcasses weighing from 240 to 400 lb (110–180 kg). Fresh pork is sold either chilled or frozen. Pork may be cured either by injecting it with a brine or by rubbing it with a mixture of salt, sugar, and other chemicals (the dry method). The skin and fat of fresh pork should be white, and the flesh should be clear, pink, and fine-grained. The principal fresh cuts are hams, loins, spareribs, shoulders, butts, and feet. The brains, snout, ears, jowls, tail, and tongue are ground up and often used in combination with other meat products.

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"pork." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"pork." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/pork

"pork." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved December 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/pork

pork

pork Meat from the pig (swine, hog), Suidae spp., eaten fresh, as opposed to bacon and ham which are cured; pigs (known in the USA as hogs) were first introduced into the USA by Hernando de Soto in 1539. By far the richest of all meat sources of vitamin B1, a 150‐g portion supplying more than the average daily requirement; a rich source of protein, niacin, vitamin B12, copper, and selenium; a good source of vitamins B2 and B6, zinc, and iron; depending on the joint contains 30–45 g of fat of which one‐third is saturated; supplies 430–500 kcal (1800–2100 kJ).

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"pork." A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"pork." A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pork

"pork." A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition. . Retrieved December 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pork

pork

pork / pôrk/ • n. 1. the flesh of a pig used as food, esp. when uncured. 2. short for pork barrel. • v. 1. [tr.] vulgar slang (of a man) have sexual intercourse with. 2. [intr.] inf. stuff oneself with food; overeat: I porked out on the roast pig.

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"pork." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"pork." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pork-0

"pork." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved December 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pork-0

pork

pork flesh of the pig used as food XIII; †swine, pig XIV. — (O)F. porc — L. porcus swine, hog (see FARROW).
Hence porker (-ER1) pig raised for food. XVII.

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"pork." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"pork." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pork-1

"pork." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved December 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pork-1

pork

porkauk, baulk, Bork, caulk (US calk), chalk, cork, dork, Dundalk, Falk, fork, gawk, hawk, Hawke, nork, orc, outwalk, pork, squawk, stalk, stork, talk, torc, torque, walk, york •pitchfork • nighthawk • goshawk •mohawk • sparrowhawk • tomahawk •back talk • peptalk • beanstalk •sweet-talk • crosstalk • small talk •smooth-talk • catwalk • jaywalk •cakewalk • space walk •sheep walk, sleepwalk •skywalk • sidewalk • crosswalk •boardwalk • rope-walk

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"pork." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"pork." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pork

"pork." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved December 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pork