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Slippers

Slippers

Slippers adorned the feet of both fashionable men and women at parties and formal evening events during the nineteenth century. Slippers were delicate foot coverings made of fabric, often satin, or soft leather. The uppers of slippers covered the heel and toes but left the top of the foot exposed. Slippers could slip on the foot or be secured with laces. Men wore black leather slippers trimmed at the toe with bows or ribbon roses for formal occasions. Women's slippers looked much like ballerina slippers with ties of leather or ribbon around the ankle. Women wore slippers in solid or two-toned colors that complimented their outfits. The delicacy of slippers required that they be worn only indoors, and by the end of the century satin pumps, heeled slip-on shoes, began to replace slippers as dress shoes for both men and women.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Lister, Margot. Costume: An Illustrated Survey from Ancient Times to the Twentieth Century. London, England: Herbert Jenkins, 1967.

Payne, Blanche, Geitel Winakor, and Jane Farrell-Beck. The History of Costume. 2nd ed. New York: HarperCollins, 1992.

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"Slippers." Fashion, Costume, and Culture: Clothing, Headwear, Body Decorations, and Footwear through the Ages. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Slippers." Fashion, Costume, and Culture: Clothing, Headwear, Body Decorations, and Footwear through the Ages. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 17, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/fashion/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/slippers-0

"Slippers." Fashion, Costume, and Culture: Clothing, Headwear, Body Decorations, and Footwear through the Ages. . Retrieved August 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/fashion/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/slippers-0

Slippers

Slippers

After the French Revolution (178999), people began to reject obvious signs of wealth. The large buckles and elaborate patterned silk shoes of earlier days were replaced with simple, plain flat-soled slippers. Slippers were made of thin kid, the skin of a baby goat, or cloth. The toes of slippers were either pointed or rounded, and the throat of the shoe, or the opening at the top of the foot, was cut into a U or V shape. The throat was left plain or a small bow was added. Slippers were often dyed to match a woman's pelisse (a light-weight coat), sash, or gloves. Light colors of green, pink, and purple were popular. Slippers first became popular for women, but by the nineteenth century men wore black slippers to formal events as well.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Cosgrave, Bronwyn. The Complete History of Costume and Fashion: From Ancient Egypt to the Present Day. New York: Checkmark Books, 2000.

Pratt, Lucy, and Linda Woolley. Shoes. London, England: V&A Publications, 1999.

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Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

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"Slippers." Fashion, Costume, and Culture: Clothing, Headwear, Body Decorations, and Footwear through the Ages. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Slippers." Fashion, Costume, and Culture: Clothing, Headwear, Body Decorations, and Footwear through the Ages. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 17, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/fashion/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/slippers

"Slippers." Fashion, Costume, and Culture: Clothing, Headwear, Body Decorations, and Footwear through the Ages. . Retrieved August 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/fashion/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/slippers