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belt

belt / belt/ • n. 1. a strip of leather or other material worn around the waist or across the chest, esp. in order to support clothes or carry weapons: a sword belt [as adj.] a belt buckle. ∎ short for seat belt. ∎  a belt worn as a sign of rank or achievement: he was awarded the victor's belt. ∎  a belt of a specified color, marking the attainment of a particular level in judo, karate, or similar sports: [as adj.] brown-belt level. ∎  a person who has reached such a level: I am a karate black belt. ∎  (the belt) the punishment of being struck with a belt. 2. a strip of material used in various technical applications, in particular: ∎  a continuous band of material used in machinery for transferring motion from one wheel to another. 3. a strip or encircling band of something having a specified nature or composition that is different from its surroundings: the asteroid belt a belt of trees. 4. a heavy blow: she ran in to administer a good belt with her stick. 5. inf. a gulp or shot of liquor: they could probably use a few belts. • v. [tr.] 1. [tr.] fasten with a belt: she paused only to belt a robe about her waist. ∎  [intr.] be fastened with a belt: the jacket belts at the waist. ∎  attach or secure with a belt: he was securely belted into the passenger seat. 2. beat or strike (someone), esp. with a belt, as a punishment. ∎  hit (something) hard: he belted the ball to the left-field fence. 3. gulp a drink quickly: belting down shots of a potent drink called arrack. PHRASES: below the belt unfair or unfairly; disregarding the rules: there has been yet another below-the-belt blow to the workers of Chicago. tighten one's belt cut one's spending; live more frugally. under one's belt 1. safely or satisfactorily achieved, experienced, or acquired: I want to get more experience under my belt. 2. (of food or drink) consumed: Gus already had a large brandy under his belt. PHRASAL VERBS: belt something out sing or play a song loudly and forcefully.DERIVATIVES: belt·ed adj. (usu. in sense 1 of the noun ).

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"belt." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"belt." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/belt-0

"belt." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/belt-0

belt

belt, girdle or band worn around the body, originally to confine loose garments. Later the girdle became a decorative accessory and was used to carry belongings. The Greeks and Romans wore ornamental cords and bands of many materials, including metal. The medieval belt displayed brilliant goldwork and gems; it carried the purse, dagger, sword, and other personal belongings of the wearer. Since then the belt has varied in style and importance. It has been symbolic of strength, of alertness, and of integrity. In folklore belts have often been accorded supernatural power.

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"belt." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"belt." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/belt

"belt." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved August 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/belt

Belt

Belt

a continuous series of objects, usually encircling something; also a broad strip of any kind usually bordering something.

Examples: belt of lechery, 1483; of mirrors, 1857; of paternosters or Our Fathers, 1844; of trees.

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"Belt." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Belt." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/belt

"Belt." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Retrieved August 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/belt

belt

belt OE., corr. to OHG. balz, ON. belti, ult. — L. balteus, -um.

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"belt." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"belt." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/belt-1

"belt." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved August 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/belt-1

belt

belt •gestalt • asphalt •belt, Celt, dealt, dwelt, felt, gelt, knelt, melt, misdealt, pelt, Scheldt, smelt, spelt, svelte, veld, welt •fan belt • seat belt • lifebelt • sunbelt •rust belt • Copperbelt • heartfelt •underfelt • backveld • bushveld •Roosevelt •atilt, built, gilt, guilt, hilt, jilt, kilt, lilt, quilt, silt, spilt, stilt, tilt, upbuilt, wilt •Vanderbilt • volte •assault, Balt, exalt, fault, halt, malt, salt, smalt, vault •cobalt • stringhalt • basalt •somersault • polevault •bolt, colt, dolt, holt, jolt, moult (US molt), poult, smolt, volt •deadbolt • Humboldt • thunderbolt •megavolt • spoilt • Iseult •consult, cult, exult, indult, insult, penult, result, ult •adult • occult • tumult • catapult •difficult • Hasselt

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"belt." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"belt." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/belt

"belt." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved August 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/belt