Skip to main content

legend

leg·end / ˈlejənd/ • n. 1. a traditional story sometimes popularly regarded as historical but unauthenticated: the legend of King Arthur according to legend he banished all the snakes from Ireland. 2. an extremely famous or notorious person, esp. in a particular field: the man was a living legend a Wall Street legend. 3. an inscription, esp. on a coin or medal. ∎  a caption: a picture of a tiger with the legend “Go ahead, make my day.” ∎  the wording on a map or diagram explaining the symbols used: see legend under Fig. 1. 4. hist. the story of a saint's life: the mosaics illustrate the legends of the saints. • adj. very well known: his speed and ferocity in attack were legend.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"legend." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 28 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"legend." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 28, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/legend-1

"legend." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved April 28, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/legend-1

legend

legend a traditional story sometimes popularly regarded as historical but not authenticated. This sense dates from the early 17th century; in Middle English, the word was used to denote the story of a saint's life, and came via Old French from medieval Latin legenda ‘things to be read’.
a legend in their own lifetime a very famous or notorious person; someone whose fame is comparable to that of a hero of legend or about whom similar stories are told.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"legend." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 28 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"legend." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 28, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/legend

"legend." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved April 28, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/legend

legend

legend
A. story of a saint's life or collection of these XIV; book of liturgical lessons XV; nonhistorical story;

B. inscription, motto XVII. — (O)F. légende — medL. legenda, prop. ‘things to be read’, n. pl. of gerundive of legere read (see LECTION), taken as fem. sg.
So legendary XVI. — medL. legendārius (sb. —ium).

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"legend." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 28 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"legend." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 28, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/legend-2

"legend." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved April 28, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/legend-2

Legend

Legend (Ger. Legende). Title given to short comps. of lyrical or epic character. Well-known examples are Dvořák's Legends, Op.59 (orch. from pf. duet) and Sibelius's 4 Lemminkäinen Legends for orch., Op.22.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Legend." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Encyclopedia.com. 28 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Legend." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 28, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/legend

"Legend." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Retrieved April 28, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/legend

legend

legendunironed, viand •prebend •beribboned, riband •husband • house husband •unquestioned • escutcheoned •brigand, ligand •legend •fecund, second, split-second •millisecond • nanosecond •microsecond • rubicund • jocund •Langland • garland • parkland •Cartland, heartland •headland • Shetland • Lakeland •mainland •eland, Leland, Wieland, Zealand, Zeeland •Greenland • heathland • Cleveland •Friesland • Queensland • midland •England • Finland • Maryland •dryland, highland, island •Iceland • Holland • dockland •Scotland •foreland, Westmorland •Auckland, Falkland •Portland • Northland •lowland, Poland, Roland •Oakland • Copland • Newfoundland •woodland • Buckland • upland •Jutland, Rutland •Ireland • moorland •Cumberland, Northumberland •Sunderland • Switzerland •Sutherland • Hammond •almond, Armand •Edmund, Redmond •Desmond, Esmond •Raymond • Grimond • Richmond •Sigmund • Sigismund • Osmond •Dortmund • unsummoned •diamond • gourmand • unopened •errand, gerund •reverend • Bertrand • dachshund •unchastened •old-fashioned, unimpassioned •unsanctioned •aforementioned, undermentioned, unmentioned •unconditioned • unsweetened •unenlightened • unleavened •self-governed • unseasoned •wizened • thousand

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"legend." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 28 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"legend." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 28, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/legend-0

"legend." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved April 28, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/legend-0