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re·port / riˈpôrt/ • v. 1. give a spoken or written account of something that one has observed, heard, done, or investigated: [tr.] the representative reported a decline in milk and meat production | police reported that the flood waters were abating | [intr.] the teacher should report on the child's progress. ∎  [intr.] cover an event or subject as a journalist or a reporter: the press reported on Republican sex scandals | the Egyptian news agency reported that a coup attempt had taken place | [tr.] the paper reported a secret program by the country to build nuclear warheads. ∎  (be reported) used to indicate that something has been stated, although one cannot confirm its accuracy: these hoaxers are reported to be hacking into airline frequencies to impersonate air traffic controllers | [as adj.] (reported) a reported $50,000 in debt. ∎  [tr.] make a formal statement or complaint about (someone or something) to the necessary authority: undisclosed illegalities are reported to the company's directors | [tr.] eight horses have been reported missing in the last month. ∎  [tr.] (of a legislative committee) formally announce that the committee has dealt with (a bill): the chairman shall report the bill to the House. See also report a bill out below. 2. [intr.] present oneself formally as having arrived at a particular place or as ready to do something: he was given three days to say goodbye to his family and report for active duty. 3. [intr.] (report to) be responsible to (a superior or supervisor): the officers now report to the Russian president, not the Politburo. • n. 1. an account given of a particular matter, esp. in the form of an official document, after thorough investigation or consideration by an appointed person or body: the chairman's annual report. ∎  a spoken or written description of an event or situation, esp. one intended for publication or broadcast in the media: press reports suggested that the government was still using secret police to help maintain public order. ∎  a teacher's written assessment of a student's work, progress, and conduct, issued at the end of a term or academic year. ∎  Law a detailed formal account of a case heard in a court, giving the main points in the judgment, esp. as prepared for publication. ∎  a piece of information that is unsupported by firm evidence and that the speaker feels may or may not be true: reports were circulating that the chairman was about to resign. ∎ dated rumor: report has it that the beetles have now virtually disappeared. ∎ archaic the way in which someone or something is regarded; reputation: whatsoever things are lovely and of good report. 2. a sudden loud noise of or like an explosion or gunfire. 3. an employee who is supervised by another employee: all of his reports are twenty-somethings with no concept of proper attire for work. PHRASES: on report (esp. of a prisoner or member of the armed forces) on a disciplinary charge.PHRASAL VERBS: report back (or report something back) 1. deliver a spoken or written account of something one has been asked to do or investigate: the deadpan voice of a police officer reporting back to his superior | every movement I made was reported back to him. 2. return to work or duty after a period of absence. report a bill out (of a committee of Congress) return a bill to the legislative body for action.DERIVATIVES: re·port·a·ble adj. ORIGIN: late Middle English: from Old French reporter (verb), report (noun), from Latin reportare ‘bring back,’ from re- ‘back’ + portare ‘carry.’ The sense ‘give an account’ gave rise to ‘submit a formal report,’ hence ‘inform an authority of one's presence’ (sense 2, mid 19th cent.) and ‘be accountable (to a superior)’ (sense 3, late 19th cent.).

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"report." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"report." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/report

"report." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/report

Report

REPORT

An official or formal statement of facts or proceedings. To give an account of; to relate; to tell or convey information; the written statement of such an account.

For example, one kind of report is the formal statement in writing made to a court by a master, a clerk, or a referee who has been appointed to inquire into a particular matter for the court. Sometimes the report of a public official is distinguished from a return. A return typically discloses something done or observed by the official, whereas a report shows the results of an investigation into matters outside the personal knowledge of the official.

Regularly published volumes of books containing accounts of decisions and opinions of various courts are sometimes referred to as reports, but more often they are called reporters.

The annual report for stockholders is prepared by a corporation, a consumer report describes the qualities of a manufactured product, and a credit report assesses the creditworthiness of a business or consumer for a bank or other lender.

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"Report." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Report." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/report

"Report." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Retrieved August 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/report

report

report rumour XIV; account of a matter XV; †musical response, note; resounding noise XVI. — OF., f. reporter :- L. reportāre carry back, bear away (spec. an account), f. RE- + portāre carry.
So vb. XIV. — OF. reporter reporter (-ER2) XIV. — OF. reporteur.

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"report." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"report." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/report-0

"report." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved August 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/report-0