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move

move / moōv/ • v. 1. [intr.] go in a specified direction or manner; change position: she stood up and moved to the door he let his eyes move across the rows of faces. ∎  [tr. often] change the place or position of: she moved the tray to a side table. ∎  change one's place of residence or work: his family moved to London when he was a child. ∎  [tr.] change the date or time of (an event). ∎  (of a player) change the position of a piece in a board game: White has forced his opponent to move | [tr.] if Black moves his bishop, he loses a pawn. 2. change or cause to change from one state, opinion, sphere, or activity to another: [intr.] the school moved over to the new course in 1987 | [tr.] she deftly moved the conversation to safer territory. ∎  [tr.] influence or prompt (someone) to do something: his deep love of music moved him to take lessons with Dr. Hill. ∎  [intr.] take action: hard-liners may yet move against him, but their success might be limited. ∎  [tr.] (usu. be moved) provoke a strong feeling, esp. of sorrow or sympathy, in: he was moved to tears by a get-well message from the president. ∎  [tr.] archaic stir up (an emotion) in someone: he justly moves one's derision. 3. [intr.] make progress; develop in a particular manner or direction: aircraft design had moved forward a long way legislators are anxious to get things moving as soon as possible. ∎  [intr.] inf. depart; start off: let's move—it's time we started shopping. ∎  [in imper.] (move it) inf. used to urge or command someone to hurry up: come on—move it! ∎  [intr.] inf. go quickly: Kenny was really moving when he made contact with a tire at the hairpin and flipped over. ∎  [intr.] (of merchandise) be sold: despite the high prices, goods are moving. ∎  [tr.] sell (merchandise). 4. [intr.] (move in/within) spend one's time or be socially active in (a particular sphere) or among (a particular group of people): they moved in different circles of friends. 5. [tr.] propose for discussion and resolution at a meeting or legislative assembly: she intends to move an amendment to the bill | I beg to move that this House deplores the current economic policies. ∎  make a formal request or application to (a court or assembly) for something: his family moved the court for adequate “maintenance expenses” to run the household. 6. [tr.] empty (one's bowels). ∎  [intr.] (of the bowels) be emptied. • n. a change of place or position: she made a sudden move toward me his eyes followed her every move. ∎  a change of house or business premises. ∎  a change of job, career, or business direction: a career move. ∎  a change of state or opinion: the country's move to independence. ∎  an action that initiates or advances a process or plan: my next move is to talk to Matthew. ∎  a maneuver in a sport or game. ∎  a change of position of a piece in a board game: that move will put your king in check. ∎  a player's turn to make such a change: it’s your move. PHRASES: get a move on [often in imper.] inf. hurry up. get moving [often in imper.] inf. make a prompt start (on a journey or an undertaking): you're here to work, so get moving. make a move take action: each army was waiting for the other side to make a move. make a move on (or put the moves on) inf. make a proposition to (someone), esp. of a sexual nature. move the goalpostssee goalpost. move heaven and earthsee heaven. move mountainssee mountain. move with the times keep abreast of current thinking or developments. not move a musclesee muscle. on the move in the process of moving from one place or job to another: it's difficult to contact her because she's always on the move. ∎  making progress: the economy appeared to be on the move. PHRASAL VERBS: move along [often in imper.] change to a new position, esp. to avoid causing an obstruction: “Move along, move along,” said the cop. move asidesee move over below. move in 1. take possession of a new house or business premises. ∎  (move in with) start to share accommodations with (an existing resident). 2. intervene, esp. so as to take control of a situation: this riot could have been avoided had the police moved in earlier. move in on approach, esp. so as to take action: the police moved in on him. ∎  become involved with so as to take control of or put pressure on: the bank did not usually move in on doubtful institutions until they were almost bankrupt. move on (or move someone on) go or cause to leave somewhere, esp. because one is causing an obstruction: the Mounties briskly ordered them to move on. ∎  (move on) progress: ballet has moved on, leaving Russia behind. move out (or move someone out) leave or cause to leave one's place of residence or work. move over (or aside) adjust one's position to make room for someone else: Jo motioned to the girls on the couch to move over. ∎  relinquish a job or leading position, typically because of being superseded by someone or something more competent or important: it's time for the film establishment to move aside and make way for a new generation. move up adjust one's position, either to be nearer or make room for someone else: there’d be room for me if you’d just move up a bit.

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"move." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"move." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 17, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/move-2

"move." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/move-2

Move

MOVE

To make an application to a court for a rule or order, or to take action in any matter. The term comprehends all things necessary to be done by a litigant to obtain an order of the court directing the relief sought. To propose a resolution, or recommend action in a deliberative body. To pass over; to be transferred, as when the consideration of a contract is said to move from one party to the other. To occasion; to contribute to; to tend or lead to.

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"Move." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Move." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 17, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/move

"Move." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Retrieved August 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/move

move

move vb. XIII. — AN. mover = OF. moveir (mod. mouvoir):- L. movēre, pt. mōvī, pp. mōtus, f. IE. base *mou- *meu- *mu-.
Hence sb. XVII. So mov(e)able XIV. — OF. movable. movement XIV. — (O)F. mouvement — medL. movimentum.

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"move." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"move." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 17, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/move-3

"move." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved August 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/move-3

move

move move with the times keep abreast of current thinking or developments.

See also move the goalposts, move heaven and earth, move mountains, the spirit moves me, we shall not be moved.

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"move." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"move." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 17, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/move

"move." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved August 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/move

move

moveapprove, groove, improve, move, prove, you've •countermove

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"move." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"move." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 17, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/move-1

"move." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved August 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/move-1

MOVE

MOVE (muːv) Men Over Violence (association for wife batterers)

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"MOVE." The Oxford Dictionary of Abbreviations. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"MOVE." The Oxford Dictionary of Abbreviations. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 17, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/move-0

"MOVE." The Oxford Dictionary of Abbreviations. . Retrieved August 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/move-0