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incorporeal

in·cor·po·re·al / ˌinkôrˈpôrēəl/ • adj. not composed of matter; having no material existence: millions believe in a supreme but incorporeal being they call God. ∎  Law having no physical existence. DERIVATIVES: in·cor·po·re·al·i·ty / -ˌpôrēˈalitē/ n. in·cor·po·re·al·ly adv. in·cor·po·re·i·ty / -pəˈrēitē/ n.

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"incorporeal." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"incorporeal." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/incorporeal

"incorporeal." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved October 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/incorporeal

Incorporeal

INCORPOREAL

Lacking a physical or material nature but relating to or affecting a body.

Under common law, incorporeal property were rights that affected a tangible item, such as a chose in action (a right to enforce a debt).

Incorporeal is the opposite of corporeal, a description of the existence of a tangible item.

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"Incorporeal." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Incorporeal." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/incorporeal

"Incorporeal." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Retrieved October 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/incorporeal