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Incapacity

INCAPACITY

The absence of legal ability, competence, or qualifications.

An individual incapacitated by infancy, for example, does not have the legal ability to enter into certain types of agreements, such as marriage or contracts.

Under provisions of workers' compensation laws, the term incapacity refers to the inability to find and retain employment due to a disease or injury that prevents the performance of the customary duties of a worker.

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"Incapacity." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Incapacity." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/incapacity

"Incapacity." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/incapacity

incapacity

in·ca·pac·i·ty / ˌinkəˈpasitē/ • n. (pl. -ties) physical or mental inability to do something or to manage one's affairs: they can be fired only for incapacity or misbehavior. ∎  legal disqualification: they are not subject to any legal incapacity.

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"incapacity." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"incapacity." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/incapacity

"incapacity." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/incapacity