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effect

ef·fect / iˈfekt/ • n. 1. a change that is a result or consequence of an action or other cause: the lethal effects of hard drugs. ∎  used to refer to the state of being or becoming operative: they succeeded in putting their strategies into effect. ∎  the extent to which something succeeds or is operative: wind power can be used to great effect. ∎  Physics a physical phenomenon, typically named after its discoverer: the Doppler effect. ∎  an impression produced in the mind of a person: gentle music can have a soothing effect. 2. (effects) the lighting, sound, or scenery used in a play, movie, or broadcast: the production relied too much on spectacular effects. 3. (effects) personal belongings: the insurance covers personal effects. • v. [tr.] (often be effected) cause (something) to happen; bring about: budget cuts that were quietly effected over four years. PHRASES: for effect in order to impress people: I suspect he's controversial for effect. in effect in operation; in force: a moratorium in effect since 1985 has been lifted. ∎  used to convey that something is the case in practice even if it is not formally acknowledged to be so: additional payments which are in effect an entrance tax. to the effect that used to refer to the general sense of something written or spoken: some comments to the effect that my essay was a little light on analysis. to that effect having that result, purpose, or meaning: she thought it a foolish rule and put a notice to that effect in a newspaper.

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"effect." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"effect." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/effect-1

"effect." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/effect-1

Effect

EFFECT

As a verb, to do; to produce; to make; to bring to pass; to execute; enforce; accomplish. As a noun,that which is produced by an agent or cause; result; outcome; consequence. The result that an instrument between parties will produce in their relative rights, or which a statute will produce upon the existing law, as discovered from the language used, the forms employed, or other materials for construing it. The operation of a law, of an agreement, or an act. The phrases take effect, be in force, and go into operation, are used interchangeably.

In the plural, a person's effects are the real andpersonal propertyof someone who has died or who makes a will.

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"Effect." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Effect." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/effect

"Effect." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Retrieved August 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/effect

effect

effect result XIV; accomplishment XV; operative influence, impression XVII; pl. goods and chattels XVIII. — OF. effect (mod. effet) or L. effectus, f. effect-, pp. stem of efficere work out, f. EF- + fic-, facere make, DO1.
Hence effect vb. XVI. Also effective XIV. — L. effectual XIV. — medL. effectuate XVI. f. medL. effectuāre, -āt-.

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"effect." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"effect." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/effect-2

"effect." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved August 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/effect-2

effect

effectabreact, abstract, act, attract, bract, compact, contract, counteract, diffract, enact, exact, extract, fact, humpbacked, hunchbacked, impact, interact, matter-of-fact, pact, protract, redact, refract, retroact, subcontract, subtract, tact, tract, transact, unbacked, underact, untracked •play-act • autodidact •artefact (US artifact) • cataract •contact •marked, unremarked •Wehrmacht •affect, bisect, bull-necked, collect, confect, connect, correct, defect, deflect, deject, detect, direct, effect, eject, elect, erect, expect, infect, inflect, inject, inspect, interconnect, interject, intersect, misdirect, neglect, object, perfect, project, prospect, protect, reflect, reject, respect, resurrect, sect, select, subject, suspect, transect, unchecked, Utrecht •prefect • abject • retroject • intellect •genuflect • idiolect • dialect • aspect •circumspect • retrospect • Dordrecht •vivisect • architect • unbaked •sun-baked

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"effect." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"effect." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/effect-0

"effect." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved August 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/effect-0