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disposition

dis·po·si·tion / ˌdispəˈzishən/ • n. 1. a person's inherent qualities of mind and character: a sweet-natured girl of a placid disposition. ∎  an inclination or tendency: the cattle showed a decided disposition to run the judge's disposition to clemency. 2. the way in which something is placed or arranged, esp. in relation to other things: the plan need not be accurate so long as it shows the disposition of the rooms. ∎  the action of arranging or ordering people or things in a particular way: the prerogative gives the state widespread powers regarding the disposition and control of the armed forces ∎  (dispositions) military preparations, in particular the stationing of troops ready for attack or defense: the new strategic dispositions of our forces. 3. Law the action of distributing or transferring property or money to someone, in particular by bequest: this is a tax that affects the disposition of assets on death. 4. the power to deal with something as one pleases: if Napoleon had had railroads at his disposition, he would have been invincible. ∎ archaic the determination of events, esp. by divine power.

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"disposition." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"disposition." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 17, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/disposition

"disposition." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved December 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/disposition

Disposition

DISPOSITION

Act of disposing; transferring to the care or possession of another. The parting with, alienation of, or giving up of property. The final settlement of a matter and, with reference to decisions announced by a court, a judge's ruling is commonly referred to as disposition, regardless of level of resolution. Incriminal procedure, the sentencing or other final settlement of a criminal case. With respect to a mental state, means an attitude, prevailing tendency, or inclination.

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"Disposition." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Disposition." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 17, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/disposition

"Disposition." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Retrieved December 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/disposition