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affirmation

af·firm·a·tion / ˌafərˈmāshən/ • n. the action or process of affirming or being affirmed: an affirmation of basic human values | he nodded in affirmation. ∎  Law a formal declaration by a person who declines to take an oath for reasons of conscience.

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"affirmation." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"affirmation." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/affirmation

"affirmation." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved July 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/affirmation

Affirmation

AFFIRMATION

A solemn and formal declaration of the truth of a statement, such as anaffidavitor the actual or prospective testimony of a witness or a party that takes the place of an oath. An affirmation is also used when a person cannot take an oath because of religious convictions.

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"Affirmation." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Affirmation." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/affirmation

"Affirmation." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Retrieved July 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/affirmation