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bus

bus [Lat. omnibus=for all], large public conveyance. A horse-drawn urban omnibus was introduced in Paris in 1662 by Blaise Pascal and his associates, but it remained in operation for only a few years. The omnibus reappeared c.1812 in Bordeaux, France, and afterward in Paris (c.1827), London (1829), and New York City (1830). It often carried passengers both inside and on the roof. Buses were motorized early in the 20th cent.; motorbus transportation increased rapidly and is now used in most countries. A number of railroad companies operate subsidiary bus lines. A network of bus lines links all parts of the United States; many small cities and towns which have lost rail service in recent years are served only by bus lines. Buses are powered usually by gasoline or diesel engines, but in a few cities electric motors fed from overhead wires are used. The construction of small buses is similar to that of heavy automobiles, while the construction of large buses is similar to that of heavy trucks. Some large cities now use articulated buses, which can seat more than 60 passengers; such buses are constructed in two parts and joined, or articulated, with an accordian–style sleeve.

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"bus." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 27 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"bus." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 27, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/bus

"bus." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved June 27, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/bus

bus

bus A signal route to which several items of a computer system may be connected in parallel so that signals can be passed between them. A bus is also called a trunk in the US, and a highway in the UK. The signals on a bus may be only of a particular kind, as in an address bus or data bus, or they may be intermixed. To maximize throughput, the number of lines in the bus should equal the sum of the number of bits in a data word, the maximum address, and the number of control lines. As this is expensive to implement, a multiplexed bus may be used.

There are a number of widely used proprietary bus systems, such as Digital Equipment's Unibus and Intel's Multibus. There is also a widely used instrumentation bus standard, referred to as IEEE-488 or as GPIB, general-purpose interface bus. For microprocessors there are a number of standardized bus systems, one of the first to be widely used being the VME bus.

The rapid development of the home computer has led to the introduction of several generations of bus systems of ever increasing speeds. Examples are ISA bus, PCI bus, AGP, USB, and Firewire.

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"bus." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. 27 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"bus." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 27, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bus

"bus." A Dictionary of Computing. . Retrieved June 27, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bus

bus

bus / bəs/ • n. (pl. bus·es or bus·ses ) 1. a large motor vehicle carrying passengers by road, esp. one serving the public on a fixed route and for a fare: [as adj.] a bus service. 2. Comput. a distinct set of conductors carrying data and control signals within a computer system, to which pieces of equipment may be connected in parallel. • v. (bus·es, bused, bus·ing or bus·ses, bus·sed, bus·sing ) 1. [tr.] (often be bused) transport in a communal road vehicle: managerial staff was bused in and out of the factory. ∎  transport (a child of one race) to a school where another race is predominant, in an attempt to promote racial integration. 2. [tr.] remove (dirty tableware) from a table in a restaurant or cafeteria: I'd never bused so many dishes in one night.

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"bus." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 27 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"bus." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 27, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bus-1

"bus." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved June 27, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bus-1

bus

bus XIX. Short for OMNIBUS.

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"bus." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 27 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"bus." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 27, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bus-2

"bus." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved June 27, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bus-2

bus

busbus, buss, concuss, cuss, fuss, Gus, huss, muss, plus, pus, Russ, sus, suss, thus, truss, us •trolleybus • minibus • blunderbuss

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"bus." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 27 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"bus." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved June 27, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bus-0