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drag

drag / drag/ • v. (dragged , drag·ging ) 1. [tr.] pull (someone or something) along forcefully, roughly, or with difficulty: we dragged the boat up the beach | fig. I dragged my eyes away. ∎  take (someone) to or from a place or event, despite their reluctance: my girlfriend is dragging me off to Atlantic City for a week. ∎  (drag oneself) go somewhere wearily, reluctantly, or with difficulty: I have to drag myself out of bed each day. ∎  move (an icon or other image) across a computer screen using a tool such as a mouse. ∎  [intr.] (of a person's clothes or an animal's tail) trail along the ground: the nuns walked in meditation, their habits dragging on the grass. ∎  [intr.] (drag at) catch hold of and pull (something): desperately, Jinny dragged at his arm. ∎  [intr.] engage in a drag race: they were caught dragging on Francis Lewis Blvd. ∎  [tr.] (of a ship) trail (an anchor) along the seabed, causing the ship to drift. ∎  [intr.] (of an anchor) fail to hold, causing a ship or boat to drift. ∎  [tr.] search the bottom of (a river, lake, or the sea) with grapnels or nets: frogmen had dragged the local river. 2. [tr.] (drag something up) inf. deliberately mention an unwelcome or unpleasant fact: pieces of evidence about his early life were dragged up. ∎  (drag someone/something into) involve someone or something in (a situation or matter), typically when such involvement is inappropriate or unnecessary: he had no right to drag you into this sort of thing. ∎  (drag something in/into) introduce an irrelevant or inappropriate subject: politics were never dragged into the conversation. ∎  (drag someone/something down) bring someone or something to a lower level or standard: the economy will be dragged down by inefficient firms. 3. [intr.] (of time, events, or activities) pass slowly and tediously: the day dragged—eventually it was time for bed. ∎  (of a process or situation) continue at tedious and unnecessary length: the dispute between the two families dragged on for years. ∎  [tr.] (drag something out) protract something unnecessarily: he dragged out the process of serving them. 4. [intr.] (drag on) inf. (of a person) inhale the smoke from (a cigarette). • n. 1. the action of pulling something forcefully or with difficulty: the drag of the current. ∎  the longitudinal retarding force exerted by air or other fluid surrounding a moving object. ∎  [in sing.] a person or thing that impedes progress or development: Larry was turning out to be a drag on her career. ∎  Fishing unnatural motion of a fishing fly caused by the pull of the line. ∎ archaic an iron shoe that can be applied as a brake to the wheel of a cart or wagon. 2. [in sing.] inf. a boring or tiresome person or thing: working nine to five can be a drag. 3. inf. an act of inhaling smoke from a cigarette: he took a long drag on his cigarette. 4. clothing more conventionally worn by the opposite sex, esp. women's clothes worn by a man: a fashion show, complete with men in drag | [as adj.] a live drag show. 5. short for drag race. ∎ inf. a street or road: the main drag. ∎ hist. a private vehicle like a stagecoach, drawn by four horses. 6. a thing that is pulled along the ground or through water, in particular: ∎ hist. a harrow used for breaking up the surface of land. ∎  an apparatus for dredging a river or for recovering the bodies of drowned people from a river, a lake, or the sea. ∎ another term for dragnet. 7. inf. influence over other people: they had the education but they didn't have the drag. 8. a strong-smelling lure drawn before hounds as a substitute for a fox or other hunted animal. ∎  a hunt using such a lure. 9. Mus. one of the basic patterns (rudiments) of drumming, consisting of a stroke preceded by two grace notes, which are usually played with the other stick. See also ruff4 . PHRASES: drag one's feet walk slowly and wearily or with difficulty. ∎  (also drag one's heels) fig. (of a person or organization) be deliberately slow or reluctant to act: the government has dragged its heels over permanent legislation. drag someone/something through the mud make damaging allegations about someone or something: he felt enough loyalty to his old school not to drag its name through the mud.in drag wearing the clothing of the opposite sex.PHRASAL VERBS: drag something out extract information from someone against their will: the truth was being dragged out of us.

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"drag." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"drag." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/drag-1

"drag." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved October 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/drag-1

drag

drag
1. The flexuring of bedding and cleavage traces along the margins of a fault plane produced by the displacement of either side. Cleavage and bedding traces are seen to dip asymptotically into and out of the plane of faulting.

2. Ductile deformation of features towards and into shear zones.

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"drag." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"drag." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/drag

"drag." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Retrieved October 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/drag

drag

drag (air resistance) Force opposing the motion of a body through a gas or liquid. Aircraft experience drag as the friction of air over external surfaces. To combat drag, aircraft and cars have streamlined designs.

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"drag." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"drag." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/drag

"drag." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved October 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/drag

drag

drag XV. Obscurely developed from OE. dragan DRAW, or — cogn. ON. draga.
Hence, or partly — MLG. dragge grapnel, drag sb. XIV.

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"drag." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"drag." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/drag-2

"drag." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved October 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/drag-2

drag

drag drag one's heels be deliberately slow or reluctant to act.
drag through the mud slander or denigrate publicly.

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"drag." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"drag." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/drag

"drag." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved October 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/drag

drag

drag See click.

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"drag." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"drag." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/drag

"drag." A Dictionary of Computing. . Retrieved October 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/drag

drag

dragbag, blag, brag, Bragg, crag, dag, drag, fag, flag, gag, hag, jag, lag, mag, nag, quag, rag, sag, scrag, shag, slag, snag, sprag, stag, swag, tag, wag, zag •ragbag • saddlebag •handbag, sandbag •gasbag • ratbag • air bag • mailbag •fleabag, tea bag •beanbag • windbag • kitbag • dillybag •carpet bag • washbag • growbag •nosebag •bumbag, scumbag •punchbag • Stalag • jetlag • greylag •gulag • dishrag • bullyrag • Morag •ragtag • dog tag • Sontag • wigwag •chinwag •scallywag (US scallawag) • zigzag

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"drag." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"drag." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/drag-0

"drag." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved October 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/drag-0