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Ohm's law

Ohm's law (ōm) [for G. S. Ohm], law stating that the electric current i flowing through a given resistance r is equal to the applied voltage v divided by the resistance, or i=v/r. For general application to alternating-current circuits where inductances and capacitances as well as resistances may be present, the law must be amended to i=v/z, where z is impedance. There are conductors in which the current that flows is not proportional to the applied voltage. These do not follow this law and are called nonohmic conductors.

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Ohms law

Ohm's law Statement that the amount of steady current through a material is proportional to the voltage across the material. For example, if the voltage doubles then the current also doubles. Proposed in 1827 by the German physicist Georg Ohm (1787–1854), Ohm's law is expressed mathematically as V = IR (where V is the voltage in volts, I is the current in amperes, and R is the resistance in ohms).

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Ohms law

Ohm's law The ratio of the voltage (V) applied to a conductor and the electric current (I) caused to flow through it at constant temperature is constant, and is the electrical resistance (R) of the conductor, such that V/I = R. At high current densities the law may break down for some materials.

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"Ohms law." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Nov. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Ohms law." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/ohms-law

"Ohms law." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Retrieved November 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/ohms-law