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verification

verification The process of checking the accuracy of transcription of information. It is generally applied to data that has been encoded via a data-preparation machine by an operator reading from a document. The documents are subsequently read by another operator and entered into a machine that compares the input with that prepared by the first operator. Any differences are signaled and a correction or confirmation action is made by the second operator.

Data may also be verified when it is copied to a storage peripheral from the main store or another storage peripheral. In this case the data is normally coded in a way that allows error detection, and verification only involves checking the written data for consistency: it is not compared with the source data.

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"verification." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"verification." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/verification

"verification." A Dictionary of Computing. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/verification

verification

verification In empiricist philosophy, knowledge-claims are accepted as scientific only if they are verifiable. To verify a statement is to provide evidence, generally of an empirical or observational kind, for believing it to be true. In logical empiricism the meaning of a statement was treated as equivalent to its method of verification, and only verifiable statements were accepted as meaningful. In non-empiricist philosophies of science, and in less extreme forms of empiricism, it is accepted that evidence may give good reasons for believing in the truth of a statement, whilst falling short of verification in the sense of conclusive proof. See also VIENNA CIRCLE.

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"verification." A Dictionary of Sociology. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"verification." A Dictionary of Sociology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/social-sciences/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/verification

"verification." A Dictionary of Sociology. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/social-sciences/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/verification

verification

ver·i·fi·ca·tion / ˌverəfiˈkāshən/ • n. the process of establishing the truth, accuracy, or validity of something: the verification of official documents. ∎  [often as adj.] Philos. the establishment by empirical means of the validity of a proposition. ∎  the process of ensuring that procedures laid down in weapons limitation agreements are followed.

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"verification." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"verification." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/verification

"verification." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/verification