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rave

rave1 / rāv/ • v. [intr.] 1. talk wildly or incoherently, as if one were delirious or insane: Nancy's having hysterics and raving about a black ghost. ∎  address someone in an angry, uncontrolled way: [with direct speech] “Never mind how he feels!” Melissa raved. 2. speak or write about someone or something with great enthusiasm or admiration: New York's theater critics raved about the acting. 3. inf. attend or take part in a rave (party). • n. 1. inf. an extremely enthusiastic recommendation or appraisal of someone or something: the film has won raves from American reviewers | [as adj.] their recent tour received rave reviews. 2. inf. a lively party or gathering involving dancing and drinking: their annual fancy-dress rave. ∎  a party or event attended by large numbers of young people, involving drug use and dancing to fast, electronic music. ∎  electronic dance music of the kind played at such events. rave2 • n. a rail of a cart. ∎  (raves) a permanent or removable framework added to the sides of a cart to increase its capacity.

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"rave." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"rave." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/rave-0

"rave." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/rave-0

Rave

RAVE

A rave is a large, typically overnight dance party with a focus on techno and related forms of music. The rave provides a venue for innovative musical forms and fashions as well as for the use and abuse of a variety of drugs known collectively as Club Drugs. Raves and the "ravers" who attend them have been a part of youth culture since the late 1980s when all-night parties and Detroit techno music sprang up in the United Kingdom to form the phenomenon that is still a social concern today. Raves are held in a variety of locales, from traditional nightclubs to warehouses to open pastures (sometimes without the knowledge of the owners). A major part of the attraction of raves is the permissive, underground atmosphere. Ravers, who are more often than not in their late teens and early twenties, enjoy the freedom from supervision that is common at raves.

Hedonism or "pleasure seeking" is also of central value in rave culture, and this correlates with a high incidence of drug use. Many ravers freely admit to the presence of various club drugs on the rave scene, particularly Methamphetamine (meth, crank, crystal, speed or whizz) and Mdma (E, X, ecstasy, or rolls) although others such as Rohypnol, Ghb, Lsd, and Ketamine have recently gained more attention in the media as club drugs. In truth, polydrug abuse is common enough on the rave scene that no list of drugs can be regarded as comprehensive. Ravers tend to regard the drugs they use as newer and safer than "older" drugs like Heroin and Pcp. This is rarely true insofar as safety is concerned. Raves have certainly seen their share of drug casualties, and are cause for concern because of the high incidence of drug problems among ravers.

Richard G. Hunter

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"Rave." Encyclopedia of Drugs, Alcohol, and Addictive Behavior. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Rave." Encyclopedia of Drugs, Alcohol, and Addictive Behavior. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/rave

"Rave." Encyclopedia of Drugs, Alcohol, and Addictive Behavior. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/rave

rave

rave †be mad; (hence) talk wildly. XIV. prob. — ONF. raver, of uncert. orig.

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"rave." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"rave." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/rave-2

rave

ravebehave, brave, Cave, clave, concave, crave, Dave, deprave, engrave, enslave, fave, forgave, gave, grave, knave, lave, Maeve, misbehave, misgave, nave, outbrave, pave, rave, save, shave, shortwave, slave, stave, they've, waive, wave •enclave • exclave • conclave •Redgrave • architrave • Wargrave •Palgrave • palsgrave • aftershave •brainwave • heatwave • microwave

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"rave." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"rave." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/rave