Skip to main content
Select Source:

jump

jump / jəmp/ • v. 1. [intr.] push oneself off a surface and into the air by using the muscles in one's legs and feet: the cat jumped off his lap | he jumped twenty-five feet to the ground. ∎  [tr.] pass over (an obstacle or barrier) in such a way. ∎  (of an athlete or horse) perform in a competition involving such action: his horse jumped well and won by five lengths. ∎  (esp. of prices or figures) rise suddenly and by a large amount: exports jumped by 500 percent during the decade. ∎ inf. (of a place) be full of lively activity: the bar is jumping on Fridays and Saturdays. ∎  [tr.] inf. (of driver or a vehicle) fail to stop at (a red traffic light). ∎  [tr.] get on or off (a train or other vehicle) quickly, typically illegally or dangerously. ∎  [tr.] take summary possession of (a mining concession or other piece of land) after alleged abandonment or forfeiture by the former occupant. 2. [intr.] (of a person) move suddenly and quickly in a specified way: Juliet jumped to her feet | they jumped back into the car and drove off. ∎  (of a person) make a sudden involuntary movement in reaction to something that causes surprise or shock: an owl hooted nearby, making her jump. ∎  pass quickly or abruptly from one idea, subject, or state to another: she jumped backward and forward in her narrative. ∎  [tr.] omit or skip over (part of something) and pass on to a further point or stage. ∎  (of a machine or device) move or jerk suddenly and abruptly: the vibration can cause the needle to jump. ∎  (of a person) make a sudden, impulsive rush to do something: Gordon jumped to my defense. ∎  [tr.] (in checkers) capture (an opponent's piece) by jumping over it. ∎  Bridge make a bid that is higher than necessary, in order to signal a strong hand: East jumped to four spades. ∎  [tr.] inf. attack (someone) suddenly and unexpectedly. ∎  [tr.] vulgar slang have sexual intercourse with (someone). 3. [tr.] inf. start (a vehicle) using jumper cables: I jumped his Camry from my Civic. • n. 1. an act of jumping from a surface by pushing upward with one's legs and feet: in making the short jump across the gully he lost his balance. ∎  an obstacle to be jumped, esp. by a horse and rider in an equestrian competition. ∎  an act of descending from an aircraft by parachute. ∎  a sudden dramatic rise in amount, price, or value: a 51 percent jump in annual profits. ∎  a large or sudden transition or change: the jump from mass-market to luxury goods. ∎  (in checkers) the act of capturing an opponent's piece by jumping over it. ∎  Bridge a bid that is higher than necessary, signaling strength. ∎ vulgar slang, dated an act of sexual intercourse. 2. a sudden involuntary movement caused by shock or surprise: I woke up with a jump. ∎  (the jumps) inf. extreme nervousness or anxiety. PHRASES: be jumping up and down inf. be very angry, upset, or excited.get (or have) the jump on someone inf. get (or have) an advantage over someone as a result of one's prompt action.jump bailsee bail1 .jump someone's bones vulgar slang have sexual intercourse with someone.jump down someone's throat inf. respond to what someone has said in a sudden and angrily critical way.jump for joy be ecstatically happy: I'm not exactly jumping for joy at the prospect.jump the gunsee gun.jump into bed with inf. engage readily in sexual intercourse with.jump in with both feet get started enthusiastically. jump on the bandwagonsee bandwagon.jump out of one's skin inf. be extremely startled.jump rope play or exercise using a jump rope.jump ship (of a sailor) leave the ship on which one is serving without having obtained permission to do so: he jumped ship in Cape Town | fig. three producers jumped ship two weeks after the show's debut. jump through hoops go through an elaborate or complicated procedure in order to achieve an objective.jump (or leap) to conclusions (or the conclusion) form an opinion hastily, before one has learned or considered all the facts.jump to it! inf. used to exhort someone to prompt or immediate action.jump the track (of a train) become derailed.one jump ahead one step or stage ahead of someone else and so having the advantage over them: the Americans were one jump ahead of the British in this.PHRASAL VERBS: jump at accept (an opportunity or offer) eagerly: he jumped at the chance to start his own company.jump off (of a military campaign) begin: the air-attack phase will continue before the ground attack jumps off.jump on inf. attack or take hold of (someone) suddenly. ∎  criticize (someone) suddenly and severely. ∎  seize on (something) eagerly; give sudden (typically critical) attention to: the paper jumped on the inconsistencies of his stories.jump out have a strong visual or mental impact; be very striking: advertising posters that really jump out at you.DERIVATIVES: jump·a·ble adj.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"jump." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"jump." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/jump-0

"jump." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/jump-0

jump

jump
1. A departure from the normal sequential execution of program instructions. The departure is achieved during execution by means of a jump instruction. (Jump instruction is usually regarded as synonomous with branch instruction.) A jump may be conditional or unconditional. See also GOTO statement.

2. (transfer) To undergo such a departure.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"jump." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"jump." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/jump

"jump." A Dictionary of Computing. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/jump

jump

jump move or be moved up and down as with a leap or spring XVI; leap over XVII; (U.S. and Colonial) take summary possession of (a claim) XIX. prob. imit.; cf. bump, thump.
Hence jump sb. XVI.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"jump." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"jump." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/jump-1

"jump." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/jump-1

jump

jumpamp, camp, champ, clamp, cramp, damp, encamp, gamp, lamp, ramp, samp, scamp, stamp, tamp, tramp, vamp •firedamp • headlamp • wheel clamp •sidelamp • spotlamp • blowlamp •sunlamp •hemp, kemp, temp •blimp, chimp, crimp, gimp, imp, limp, pimp, primp, scrimp, shrimp, simp, skimp, wimp •chomp, clomp, comp, pomp, romp, stomp, swamp, tromp, whomp, yomp •bump, chump, clump, crump, dump, flump, frump, gazump, grump, hump, jump, lump, outjump, plump, pump, rump, scrump, slump, stump, sump, thump, trump, tump, ump, whump •ski-jump • showjump • handpump •mugwump

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"jump." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"jump." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/jump

"jump." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/jump