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hub

hub In general, a unit that operates in some sense as the center of a star configuration. In the case of a network, a hub acts as a local concentrator that allows a number of devices, connected to the hub in a star configuration, to connect to a network with an arbitrary configuration. In the special case of an Ethernet network, a hub may refer to a device that provides connection for a number of end-user devices, each using a dedicated twisted-pair (CAT-3 or CAT-5 cables) local connection, to an Ethernet segment running on either a coaxial cable (thick or thin Ethernet) or an optical fiber.

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"hub." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"hub." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/hub

"hub." A Dictionary of Computing. . Retrieved August 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/hub

hub

hub / həb/ • n. the central part of a wheel, rotating on or with the axle, and from which the spokes radiate. ∎  a place or thing that forms the effective center of an activity, region, or network: the kitchen was the hub of family life. PHRASES: hub-and-spoke denoting a system of air transportation in which local airports offer flights to a central airport where international or long-distance flights are available.

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"hub." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"hub." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/hub-0

"hub." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/hub-0

hub

hub nave of a wheel. XVII. of unkn. orig. cf. HOB2.

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"hub." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"hub." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/hub-1

"hub." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved August 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/hub-1

hub

hubblub, bub, chub, Chubb, club, cub, drub, dub, flub, grub, hub, nub, pub, rub, scrub, shrub, slub, snub, stub, sub, tub •Beelzebub • hubbub • syllabub •wolfcub • nightclub • bathtub •twintub • washtub

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"hub." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"hub." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/hub

"hub." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved August 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/hub