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frame

frame / frām/ • n. 1. a rigid structure that surrounds or encloses something such as a door or window. ∎  (frames) a metal or plastic structure holding the lenses of a pair of glasses. ∎  a case or border enclosing a mirror or picture. ∎  the rigid supporting structure of an object such as a vehicle, building, or piece of furniture. ∎  a person's body with reference to its size or build: a shiver shook her slim frame. ∎  a boxlike structure of glass or plastic in which seeds or young plants are grown. ∎  [in sing.] archaic or poetic/lit. the universe, or part of it, regarded as an embracing structure. ∎  [in sing.] archaic or poetic/lit. the structure, constitution, or nature of someone or something: we have in our inward frame various affections. 2. [usu. in sing.] a basic structure that underlies or supports a system, concept, or text: the establishment of conditions provides a frame for interpretation. ∎  technical short for frame of reference: the Earth's motion relative to the frame of the distant galaxies. ∎  the genre or form of a literary text determining its expected style and content: my poems look as though they have a classical frame. ∎  [often as adj.] an enclosing section of narrative, esp. one which foregrounds or comments on the primary narrative of a text: a frame narrator reports the narrative spoken by an inner narrator. 3. Linguistics a structural environment within which a class of words or other linguistic units can be correctly used. For example I —— him is a frame for a large class of transitive verbs. 4. a single complete picture in a series forming a movie, television, or video film. ∎  a single picture in a comic strip. ∎  Comput. a graphic panel in a display window, especially in an Internet browser, that encloses a self-contained section of data and permits multiple independent document viewing. 5. another term for rack1 (sense 4). ∎  a round of play in bowling. ∎ inf. an inning in a baseball game: he closed out the game by pitching two hitless frames. 6. short for frame-up. • v. [tr.] 1. place (a picture or photograph) in a frame: he had the photo framed. ∎  surround so as to create a sharp or attractive image: a short, strong style cut to frame the face. 2. erect the framework of a building.3. create or formulate (a concept, plan, or system): the staff have proved invaluable in framing the proposals. ∎  form or articulate (words): he walked out before she could frame a reply. ∎ archaic make or construct (something) by fitting parts together or in accordance with a plan: what immortal hand or eye could frame thy fearful symmetry? 4. inf. produce false evidence against (an innocent person) so that they appear guilty: he claims he was framed. PHRASES: frame of mind a particular mood that influences one's attitude or behavior.DERIVATIVES: fram·a·ble / -məbəl/ adj. frame·less adj. fram·er n. frame / frām/ • n. 1. a rigid structure that surrounds or encloses something such as a door or window. ∎  (frames) a metal or plastic structure holding the lenses of a pair of glasses. ∎  a case or border enclosing a mirror or picture. ∎  the rigid supporting structure of an object such as a vehicle, building, or piece of furniture. ∎  a person's body with reference to its size or build: a shiver shook her slim frame. ∎  a boxlike structure of glass or plastic in which seeds or young plants are grown. ∎  [in sing.] archaic or poetic/lit. the universe, or part of it, regarded as an embracing structure. ∎  [in sing.] archaic or poetic/lit. the structure, constitution, or nature of someone or something: we have in our inward frame various affections. 2. [usu. in sing.] a basic structure that underlies or supports a system, concept, or text: the establishment of conditions provides a frame for interpretation. ∎  technical short for frame of reference: the Earth's motion relative to the frame of the distant galaxies. ∎  the genre or form of a literary text determining its expected style and content: my poems look as though they have a classical frame. ∎  [often as adj.] an enclosing section of narrative, esp. one which foregrounds or comments on the primary narrative of a text: a frame narrator reports the narrative spoken by an inner narrator. 3. Linguistics a structural environment within which a class of words or other linguistic units can be correctly used. For example I —— him is a frame for a large class of transitive verbs. 4. a single complete picture in a series forming a movie, television, or video film. ∎  a single picture in a comic strip. ∎  Comput. a graphic panel in a display window, especially in an Internet browser, that encloses a self-contained section of data and permits simultaneous viewing of multiple documents. 5. another term for rack1 (sense 4). ∎  a round of play in bowling. ∎ inf. an inning in a baseball game: he closed out the game by pitching two hitless frames. 6. short for frame-up. • v. [tr.] 1. place (a picture or photograph) in a frame: he had the photo framed. ∎  surround so as to create a sharp or attractive image: a short, strong style cut to frame the face. 2. erect the framework of a building.3. create or formulate (a concept, plan, or system): the staff have proved invaluable in framing the proposals. ∎  form or articulate (words): he walked out before she could frame a reply. ∎ archaic make or construct (something) by fitting parts together or in accordance with a plan: what immortal hand or eye could frame thy fearful symmetry? 4. inf. produce false evidence against (an innocent person) so that they appear guilty: he claims he was framed. PHRASES: frame of mind a particular mood that influences one's attitude or behavior.DERIVATIVES: fram·a·ble / -məbəl/ adj. frame·less adj. fram·er n.

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"frame." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"frame." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 25, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/frame-3

"frame." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved April 25, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/frame-3

frame

frame / frām/ • n. 1. a rigid structure that surrounds or encloses something such as a door or window. ∎  (frames) a metal or plastic structure holding the lenses of a pair of glasses. ∎  a case or border enclosing a mirror or picture. ∎  the rigid supporting structure of an object such as a vehicle, building, or piece of furniture. ∎  a person's body with reference to its size or build: a shiver shook her slim frame. ∎  a boxlike structure of glass or plastic in which seeds or young plants are grown. ∎  [in sing.] archaic or poetic/lit. the universe, or part of it, regarded as an embracing structure. ∎  [in sing.] archaic or poetic/lit. the structure, constitution, or nature of someone or something: we have in our inward frame various affections. 2. [usu. in sing.] a basic structure that underlies or supports a system, concept, or text: the establishment of conditions provides a frame for interpretation. ∎  technical short for frame of reference: the Earth's motion relative to the frame of the distant galaxies. ∎  the genre or form of a literary text determining its expected style and content: my poems look as though they have a classical frame. ∎  [often as adj.] an enclosing section of narrative, esp. one which foregrounds or comments on the primary narrative of a text: a frame narrator reports the narrative spoken by an inner narrator. 3. Linguistics a structural environment within which a class of words or other linguistic units can be correctly used. For example I —— him is a frame for a large class of transitive verbs. 4. a single complete picture in a series forming a movie, television, or video film. ∎  a single picture in a comic strip. ∎  Comput. a graphic panel in a display window, especially in an Internet browser, that encloses a self-contained section of data and permits multiple independent document viewing. 5. another term for rack1 (sense 4). ∎  a round of play in bowling. ∎ inf. an inning in a baseball game: he closed out the game by pitching two hitless frames. 6. short for frame-up. • v. [tr.] 1. place (a picture or photograph) in a frame: he had the photo framed. ∎  surround so as to create a sharp or attractive image: a short, strong style cut to frame the face. 2. erect the framework of a building.3. create or formulate (a concept, plan, or system): the staff have proved invaluable in framing the proposals. ∎  form or articulate (words): he walked out before she could frame a reply. ∎ archaic make or construct (something) by fitting parts together or in accordance with a plan: what immortal hand or eye could frame thy fearful symmetry? 4. inf. produce false evidence against (an innocent person) so that they appear guilty: he claims he was framed. PHRASES: frame of mind a particular mood that influences one's attitude or behavior.DERIVATIVES: fram·a·ble / -məbəl/ adj. frame·less adj. fram·er n. frame / frām/ • n. 1. a rigid structure that surrounds or encloses something such as a door or window. ∎  (frames) a metal or plastic structure holding the lenses of a pair of glasses. ∎  a case or border enclosing a mirror or picture. ∎  the rigid supporting structure of an object such as a vehicle, building, or piece of furniture. ∎  a person's body with reference to its size or build: a shiver shook her slim frame. ∎  a boxlike structure of glass or plastic in which seeds or young plants are grown. ∎  [in sing.] archaic or poetic/lit. the universe, or part of it, regarded as an embracing structure. ∎  [in sing.] archaic or poetic/lit. the structure, constitution, or nature of someone or something: we have in our inward frame various affections. 2. [usu. in sing.] a basic structure that underlies or supports a system, concept, or text: the establishment of conditions provides a frame for interpretation. ∎  technical short for frame of reference: the Earth's motion relative to the frame of the distant galaxies. ∎  the genre or form of a literary text determining its expected style and content: my poems look as though they have a classical frame. ∎  [often as adj.] an enclosing section of narrative, esp. one which foregrounds or comments on the primary narrative of a text: a frame narrator reports the narrative spoken by an inner narrator. 3. Linguistics a structural environment within which a class of words or other linguistic units can be correctly used. For example I —— him is a frame for a large class of transitive verbs. 4. a single complete picture in a series forming a movie, television, or video film. ∎  a single picture in a comic strip. ∎  Comput. a graphic panel in a display window, especially in an Internet browser, that encloses a self-contained section of data and permits simultaneous viewing of multiple documents. 5. another term for rack1 (sense 4). ∎  a round of play in bowling. ∎ inf. an inning in a baseball game: he closed out the game by pitching two hitless frames. 6. short for frame-up. • v. [tr.] 1. place (a picture or photograph) in a frame: he had the photo framed. ∎  surround so as to create a sharp or attractive image: a short, strong style cut to frame the face. 2. erect the framework of a building.3. create or formulate (a concept, plan, or system): the staff have proved invaluable in framing the proposals. ∎  form or articulate (words): he walked out before she could frame a reply. ∎ archaic make or construct (something) by fitting parts together or in accordance with a plan: what immortal hand or eye could frame thy fearful symmetry? 4. inf. produce false evidence against (an innocent person) so that they appear guilty: he claims he was framed. PHRASES: frame of mind a particular mood that influences one's attitude or behavior.DERIVATIVES: fram·a·ble / -məbəl/ adj. frame·less adj. fram·er n.

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"frame." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"frame." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 25, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/frame-2

"frame." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved April 25, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/frame-2

frame

frame, framing, frame analysis In Frame Analysis (1974), Erving Goffman defines a ‘frame’ as ‘definitions of the situation [that] are built up in accordance with the principles of organization which govern events–at least social ones–and our subjective involvement in them’. Frame analysis is therefore concerned with the organization of experience. In a wider context, there is a considerable body of research literature (mainly in social psychology but also in sociology) to suggest that people's responses to questionnaire or interview items are partly dependent on how they ‘frame’ the questions, most notably whether a particular query is defined as being a distant issue of ‘macro’ or systemic concern, or a ‘micro’ issue that affects individuals directly. Similar ‘framing’ effects have been observed as a result of issues being defined as aspects of the economic rather than the non-economic' spheres of life; the perceived time-horizon involved; and the definition of the imputed goals that are imagined to be the objectives of particular interactions (see, for example, W. Arts et al. , ‘Income and the Idea of Justice: Principles, Judgements and their Framing’, Journal of Economic Psychology, 1991
).

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"frame." A Dictionary of Sociology. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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frame

frame
1. The total amount of information presented on a display at any one time.

2. A single message or packet on a data link using a data link control protocol such as HDLC, ADCCP, etc. The frame is the unit of error detection, retransmission, etc. A special pattern of bits – a flag – marks the beginning and ending of the frame. In the HDLC protocol, a flag is the 8-bit sequence 01111110

that when followed by any sequence of bits other than another flag denotes the beginning of a frame of data; the flag is maintained as a unique synchronizing sequence of bits since the rules of the protocol require that a 0 is automatically inserted by the sending equipment whenever it detects the presence of five 1s in the input data stream.

3. In general, a complete or self-identifying message in a data communication system.

4. A section of a recording on magnetic tape that comprises a single bit in each track.

5. See frames.

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"frame." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"frame." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 25, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/frame

"frame." A Dictionary of Computing. . Retrieved April 25, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/frame

frame

frame frame of mind a particular mood that influences one's behaviour. Frame to mean mental or emotional condition or state is recorded from the mid 17th century, and frames and feelings was often used in the religious literature of the 18th and 19th centuries as a pejorative term for an emotional state as an indicator of the reality of spiritual life.
frame of reference originally, a system of geometrical axes in relation to which size, position, or motion can be defined. In extended use, a set of criteria in relation to which judgements can be made.

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"frame." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"frame." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved April 25, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/frame

frame

frame.
1. Skeletal structure of concrete, steel, or timber on which floors, roof, and external cladding are placed to form the building, as opposed to a structure of heavy load-bearing walls.

2. Frame of a door.

3. Surround of an opening, usually an architrave, trim, or border. A frame-house is a dwelling constructed of a timber frame, clad with clap- or weather-boarding, or with shingles, found on the east coast of the USA.

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"frame." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"frame." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 25, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/frame

"frame." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Retrieved April 25, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/frame

frame

frame
A. †be profitable; †progress OE.,

B. †prepare timber for building XIV; (gen.) shape construct, contrive XIV. OE. framian be of service, make progress, f. fram forward (see FROM) The rel. ON. fremja (= OE. fremman, fremian) further, advance, perform, prob. infl. the sense-development.
Hence frame sb. framed work, structure XIV; order, plan XVI; whence framework XVII.

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"frame." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"frame." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 25, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/frame-5

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Frame

Frame

a number of vehicles travelling together; a scaffold or framework, usually used figuratively.

Examples: the heavy frame of the forest, 1848; frame of mind, 1711; of our monarchy, 1844; of society, 1825; of the spirit, 1665; of sticks, 1577; of timber, 1545; of waggons [number travelling together]; of the world, 1561.

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"Frame." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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frame

frameacclaim, aflame, aim, became, blame, came, claim, dame, exclaim, fame, flame, frame, game, lame, maim, misname, name, proclaim, same, shame, tame •endgame • counterclaim • nickname •byname • filename • forename •surname • airframe • mainframe •Ephraim • doorframe • subframe •underframe • aspartame

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"frame." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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FRAME

FRAME (freɪm) Fund for the Replacement of Animals in Medical Experiments

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