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form

form. The structure and design of a composition. Whereas in the 16th and 17th cents. instr. comps. were usually very brief (e.g. a movt. in a kbd. suite of Byrd or Purcell), by the 19th cent. they were frequently long (e.g. a sonata or sym. movt. of the later Beethoven, Bruckner, and Mahler). This implies an enormous growth in the understanding of the principles of form and in mastery of the application of those principles. In general, however, despite continuous experimentation the mus. forms so far devised can be classified into no more than 6 categories, all of them exploiting the idea of contrast plus variety both in the domain of content (thematic material) and in that of key (combinations of these are, of course, possible, e.g. in simple ternary form each section can be in binary form, and so on).(1) SIMPLE BINARY FORM (e.g. in the movts. of Bach's kbd. suites) has no strong contrast of material. The 1st section opens in the tonic key and then modulates, as it ends, into the key of the dominant (or in the case of a minor key, sometimes the relative major). The 2nd section then opens in that 2nd key and, before it ends, modulates back to the 1st. There are, then, 2 distinct main cadences, or points of rest, the 1st in the dominant (or relative major), and the 2nd in the tonic. This form, although it sometimes attained fairly considerable dimensions in the 18th cent., is unsuitable for very long pieces, since the variety offered to the listener is almost entirely confined to details of treatment and the element of key, the thematic material employed throughout being the same. This form has been little used since c.1750. (2) TERNARY FORM. This is one of the most commonly used forms for short comps. It consists of a first section (more or less complete and self-contained), a 2nd section, contrasting as to mus. material and key (normally in the dominant or the tonic minor or relative major), and then the first section repeated. See ABA. (3) COMPOUND BINARY FORM (also known as SONATA FORM, because often employed in the first or some other movt. or movts. of a sonata; and as FIRST MOVEMENT FORM for the same reason). This derives historically from simple binary form but has developed into something more resembling ternary form. Like simple binary it falls into 2 sections, of which the 1st modulates to the dominant and the 2nd takes us back to the tonic. But the sections have become elaborated as follows:

1st section. Strain I (first subject) in tonic key; followed by Strain II (2nd Subject) in dominant key. Those 2 strains (or subjects) are generally contrasted in character. This section is called the exposition.

2nd section. Some development (also called ‘working-out’ or ‘free fantasia’) of the material in the previous section, followed by a repetition (recapitulation) of that section, but this time with both subjects in the tonic key so that the piece may end in the key with which it opened.

Further details may incl. (a) a bridge passage, leading (in both sections) from the first subject to the second; (b) a closing passage (coda), at the end of each section.

A tendency towards the evolution of simple binary form into compound binary form may be observed in some of Bach's movts., but its first real exploitation is connected with the name and fame of his son, C. P. E. Bach, and the further exploitation and elaboration with the names of Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, and their contemporaries. This form is still in frequent use, but 20th cent. composers have modified it in detail. (4) RONDO FORM This may be considered an extension of ternary form. If the 3 sections of that form are indicated by the formula ABA, then the rondo form must be indicated by ABACADA, or some variant of this. (The sections B, C, D, etc. are often spoken of as episodes).

SONATA-RONDO FORM, as its name implies, offers a combination of compound binary and rondo forms. The general plan is as follows: 1st section. Subject I, subject II in another key, subject I repeated. 2nd section. Development of the previous subject-material. 3rd section. Subject I and subject II again, but the latter this time in the same key as subject I.

Sometimes the development above mentioned is replaced by new material. And there are other variants. (5) AIR WITH VARIATIONS. This form, which from the 16th cent. to the present day has been popular with composers of every class from the most trivial to the most serious, consists, as the name implies, of one theme (or ‘subject’), first played in its simplicity and then many times repeated with elaborations, each variation thus taking on its own individuality.

There are very many types of comp. to which distinctive names are given, each representing not a ‘form’ but rather a style in which one of the above forms is presented; such as the nocturne, the gavotte, the barcarolle, the Konzertstück, and others.

With the development of elec. mus. and the use of aleatory techniques in 20th-cent. comps., the use of form is stretched to meet whatever the composer may wish to do. Infinite flexibility would seem to be the guiding principle in works of this kind. (6) See fugue.

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form

form / fôrm/ • n. 1. the visible shape or configuration of something: the form, color, and texture of the tree. ∎  arrangement of parts; shape: the entities underlying physical form. ∎  the body or shape of a person or thing: his eyes scanned her slender form. ∎  arrangement and style in literary or musical composition: these videos are a triumph of form over content. ∎  Philos. the essential nature of a species or thing, esp. (in Plato's thought) regarded as an abstract ideal that real things imitate or participate in. 2. a mold, frame, or block in or on which something is shaped. ∎  a temporary structure for holding fresh concrete in shape while it sets. 3. a particular way in which a thing exists or appears; a manifestation: her obsession has taken the form of compulsive exercise. ∎  any of the ways in which a word may be spelled, pronounced, or inflected: an adjectival rather than adverbial form. ∎  the structure of a word, phrase, sentence, or discourse: every distinction in meaning is associated with a distinction in form. 4. a type or variety of something: sponsorship is a form of advertising. ∎  an artistic or literary genre. ∎  Bot. a taxonomic category that ranks below variety, which contains organisms differing from the typical kind in some trivial, frequently impermanent, character, e.g., a color variant. Compare with subspecies and variety. 5. the customary or correct method or procedure; what is usually done: an excessive concern for legal form and precedent. ∎  a set order of words; a formula. ∎  a formality or item of mere ceremony: the outward forms of religion. 6. a printed document with blank spaces for information to be inserted: an application form. 7. chiefly Brit. a class or year in a school, usually given a specifying number: the fifth form. 8. the state of an athlete or sports team with regard to their current standard of performance: illness has affected his form | they've been in good form this season. ∎  details of previous performances by a racehorse or greyhound: an interested bystander studying the form. 9. variant spelling of forme. • v. [tr.] 1. bring together parts or combine to create (something): the company was formed in 1982. ∎  (form people/things into) organize people or things into (a group or body): peasants and miners were formed into a militia. ∎  go to make up or constitute: the precepts that form the basis of the book. ∎  [intr.] gradually appear or develop: a thick mist was forming all around. ∎  conceive (an idea or plan) in one's mind. ∎  enter into or contract (a relationship): the women would form supportive friendships. ∎  articulate (a word, speech sound, or other linguistic unit). ∎  construct (a new word) by derivation or inflection. 2. make or fashion into a certain shape or form: form the dough into balls. ∎  [intr.] (form into) be made or fashioned into a certain shape or form: his strong features formed into a smile of pleasure. ∎  (be formed) have a specified shape: her body was slight and flawlessly formed. ∎  shape or develop by training or discipline. ∎  influence or shape (something abstract): the role of the news media in forming public opinion. PHRASES: in form (of an athlete or sports team) playing or performing well. off form (of an athlete or sports team) not playing or performing well.DERIVATIVES: form·a·bil·i·ty n. / ˌfôrməˈbilətē/ form·a·ble adj.

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"form." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 28 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Form

170. Form

allomerism
variability of a chemical compound in which there is no variation in crystalline form. allomeric, adj.
amorphism
the quality of being shapeless. Also, Rare. amorphy . amorphic, adj.
anamorphism
a distorted image of an object, as in anamorphic art. Also anamorphosis . anamorphic, adj.
anamorphoscope
a cylindrical mirror for correcting the distorted image created by anamorphism.
anamorphosis, anamorphosy
anamorphism.
decussation
the state of being in the form of an X. See also 230. JOINING .
geomorphology
Physical Geography. the study of the characteristics, origins, and development of land forms. geomorphologist, n. geomorphologic, geomorphological, adj.
gibbosity
the state or condition of being curved, especially convexly. gibbous, adj.
hemitery
any minor malformation.
heteromorphism, heteromorphy
1 . the quality of differing in form from the standard or norm.
2 . the condition of existing in different forms at different stages of development, as certain insects. heteromorphic, adj.
idiomorphism
the state or quality of having a peculiar or characteristic form; uniqueness or individuality in form. idiomorphic, adj.
incorporealism
the state of having no material body or form. incorporeity, n.
morphogenesis
the origin(s) of the various aspects of the form of an organism. Also called morphogeny . morphogenetic, adj.
morphography
the scientific description of form. morphographer, n. morphographic, adj.
morphology
1 . the study of the form or structure of anything.
2 . the branch of biology that studies the form and structure of plants and animals. See also geomorphology. morphologist, n. morphologic, morphological, adj.
morphometry
the process or technique of measuring the external form of an object. morphometrical, adj.
morphonomy
the study of the laws governing form in nature. morphonomic, adj.
morphophyly
the study of the phylogeny of forms.
omniformity
the state or quality of having every form. omniform, adj.
orthogonality
the state or quality of being right-angled or perpendicular. orthogonal, adj.
palingenesis
1 . the phase in the development of an organism in which its form and structure pass through the changes undergone in the evolution of the species.
2 . the morphological and structural changes that occur during insect development. Also palingenesia, palingenesy. palingenetic, adj.
promorphology
the branch of morphology that studies the forms of organisms from a mathematical point of view. promorphologist, n. promorphological adj.
schematism
the form, disposition, or outline of a thing or concept. schematist, n.
tectology
a branch of morphology that regards an organism as made up of other organisms. tectological, adj.
tetramorphism
the property of displaying four different forms. tetramorph, n. tetramorphic, adj.
trimorphism
the state or quality of occurring in three distinct forms, usually at different stages of development, as certain plants, organisms, etc. trimorphic, trimorphous, adj.

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FORM

FORM.
1. In LOGIC, the abstract relations of terms in a proposition, and of propositions in a syllogism.

2. In LINGUISTICS, an inflected variant of a word: men as the plural form of man; see, sees, saw, seen, seeing as the forms of the verb see.

3. In linguistics, a category such as ‘noun’ when analysed in terms of structure (singular man, plural men) and FUNCTION (subject and object of sentence). Items that share characteristics belong to the same form class: the forms happy and careful belong to the adjective form class. Criteria of form are used to identify units and classes of units. Words such as man and information are identified as nouns by the formal criterion (among others) that they can be the main words in a phrase that functions as the subject of a sentence (man in That man looks familiar) or as the object of a preposition (information in This is for your information only). The criterion may be negative: nouns, unlike most adjectives, do not have comparative and superlative forms: there are adjective forms happier and happiest alongside happy, but no corresponding forms for girl. In contrast, notional or semantic criteria identify units and classes by meaning: a noun defined as the name of a person, thing, or place; a verb as a doing word. While such criteria may adequately characterize central members of a class, they are not comprehensive. The notional definition of a noun does not cover such words as action, existence, happiness, temperature that belong to the noun form class on formal criteria. See MORPHOLOGY, PARADIGM.

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Form

FORM

A prototype of an instrument to be employed in a legal transaction or a judicial proceeding that includes the primary essential matters, the appropriate technical phrases or terms, and any additional material required to render it officially accurate, arranged in suitable and systematic order, and conducive toadaptationto the circumstances of the particular case.

The expression form of the statute signifies the language or structure of a statute, and, therefore, the restriction or command that it might include, as used in the phrase in criminal pleading "against the form of statute in that case made and provided."

A matter of form, as distinguished from a matter of substance—with respect to pleadings, affidavits, indictments, and other legal instruments—entails the method, style, or form of relating the applicable facts; the selection or arrangement of terms; and other such matters without influencing the essential sufficiency or validity of the instrument, or without reaching the merits.

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form

form
A. visible aspect of a thing XIII; (scholastic philos.) that which makes matter a determinate kind of thing XIV.

B. character, nature, †degree XIII (class in school XVI); due observance or procedure XIV;

C. lair of a hare XIII; long seat without a back XIV; (typogr.) see FORME XV. ME. forme, f(o)urme — (O)F. forme, †f(o)urme :- L. fōrma mould, shape, beauty, of uncert. orig.
So vb. give a form to XIII; be the components of XIV; draw up or dispose in order XVIII. — OF. fourmer, (also mod.) former — L. fōrmāre. formal XIV. — L. formalism XIX, formalist XVII, formality XVI. formation XV. — (O)F. or L. formative XV.

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form

form
1. A page of printer media. It may be a single sheet or a multipart set, i.e. a number of sheets interleaved with carbon paper or coated so that a single impact will produce similar marks on all sheets. The sheets may be joined to form a continuous web, with sprocket holes at the edges to allow automatic feeding through printers. The paper may be preprinted with headings, fixed information, and lines or boxes. Preprinted single sheets are commonly used with laser printers and inkjet printers.

2. The data structure within a computer system representing the final result to be printed or displayed.

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form

form The overall shape of a crystal. If it is able to grow freely, a crystal develops with a regular pattern of crystal faces and interfacial angles which are characteristic of a particular mineral. The study of this regularity of crystal form, and of the internal structure to which it is related, is called ‘crystallography’.

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"form." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 28 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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form

form
1. A category used in the classification of organisms into which different types of a variety may be placed.

2. Any distinct variant within a species. Seasonal variants, e.g. the tawny brown (summer) and blue-white (winter) forms of the blue hare, may be called forms, as may the different types that constitute a polymorphism.

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form

form form follows function guiding principle taught by proponents of the architectural Modernist movement; the phrase was coined by the American architect Louis Henri Sullivan (1856–1924).

see also imitation is the sincerest form of flattery.

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form

formconform, corm, dorm, form, forme, haulm, lukewarm, Maugham, misinform, norm, outperform, perform, shawm, storm, swarm, transform, underperform, warm •landform • platform • cubiform •fungiform, spongiform •aliform • bacilliform •cuneiform, uniform •variform • vitriform • cruciform •unciform • retiform • multiform •oviform • triform • microform •chloroform • cairngorm • sandstorm •barnstorm •brainstorm, rainstorm •windstorm • snowstorm • firestorm •thunderstorm

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