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extension

ex·ten·sion / ikˈstenshən/ • n. 1. a part that is added to something to enlarge or prolong it; a continuation: the railroad's southern extension. ∎  a room or set of rooms added to an existing building. ∎  the action or process of becoming or making something larger: the extension of the president's powers. ∎  an increase in the length of time given to someone to hold office, complete a project, or fulfill an obligation. ∎  Comput. an optional suffix to a file name, typically consisting of a period followed by several characters, indicating the file's content or function. 2. (also extension cord) a length of electric cord that permits the use of an appliance at some distance from a fixed socket. ∎  an extra telephone on the same line as the main one. 3. [usu. as adj.] instruction by a university or college for students who do not attend full time: extension courses. 4. (extensions) lengths of real or artificial hair woven into a person's own hair.5. the action of moving a limb from a bent to a straight position: seizures with sudden rigid extension of the limbs. ∎  the muscle action controlling this: triceps extension. ∎  Ballet the ability of a dancer to raise one leg above the waist, or an instance of this. ∎  Med. the application of traction to a fractured or dislocated limb or to an injured or diseased spinal column to restore it to its normal position. ∎  the lengthening of a horse's stride within a particular gait. 6. Physics & Philos. the property of occupying space; spatial magnitude: nature, for Descartes, was pure extension in space. PHRASES: by extension taking the same line of argument further: the disclosures raised serious questions about his credibility and, by extension, the credibility of the company.DERIVATIVES: ex·ten·sion·al / -shənl/ adj.

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"extension." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"extension." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 17, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/extension-0

"extension." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/extension-0

Extension

EXTENSION

An increase in the length of time specified in a contract.

A part constituting an addition or enlargement, as in an annex to a building or an extension to a house. Addition to existing facilities.

An allowance of additional time for the payment of debts. An agreement between a debtor and his or her creditors, by which they allow the debtor further time for the payment of liabilities. A creditor's indulgence by giving a debtor further time to pay an existing debt.

The word extension, when used in its proper and usual sense in connection with a lease, means a prolongation of the previous leasehold estate. The distinction between extension and renewal of lease is chiefly that, in the case of renewal, a new lease is requisite, while, in the case of extension, the same lease continues in force during an additional period upon performance of a stipulated act. An option for renewal implies giving a new lease on the same terms as those of an old lease, while an option for extension contemplates acontinuanceof an old lease for a further period.

Request for additional time to file an income tax return beyond the due date.

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"Extension." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Extension." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 17, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/extension

"Extension." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Retrieved August 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/extension

extension

extension of a source. In coding theory, the process of encoding several symbols at a time, or the results thereof. If the symbols of a q-ary information source are taken r at a time, and the words of length r are treated (e.g. encoded) as if they were themselves symbols of an alphabet of size qr, then this compound source is called the rth extension of the original source. See also source coding theorem.

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"extension." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"extension." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 17, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/extension

"extension." A Dictionary of Computing. . Retrieved August 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/extension

extension

extension A measure of the change in length of a line from its initial unit length. Extension may be positive (elongation) or negative (shortening), depending on whether the length of the line increases or decreases. The simplest type of extension (e) is calculated from: e = (LfL0)/L0, where Lf is the final length and L0 the original unit length.

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"extension." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"extension." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 17, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/extension

"extension." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Retrieved August 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/extension

extension

extension (iks-ten-shŏn) n.
1. the act of extending or stretching, especially the muscular movement by which a limb is straightened.

2. the application of traction to a fractured or dislocated limb in order to restore it to its normal position.

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"extension." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"extension." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 17, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/caregiving/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/extension

"extension." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Retrieved August 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/caregiving/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/extension

extension

extensionashen, fashion, passion, ration •abstraction, action, attraction, benefaction, compaction, contraction, counteraction, diffraction, enaction, exaction, extraction, faction, fraction, interaction, liquefaction, malefaction, petrifaction, proaction, protraction, putrefaction, redaction, retroaction, satisfaction, stupefaction, subtraction, traction, transaction, tumefaction, vitrifaction •expansion, mansion, scansion, stanchion •sanction •caption, contraption •harshen, Martian •cession, discretion, freshen, session •abjection, affection, circumspection, collection, complexion, confection, connection, convection, correction, defection, deflection, dejection, detection, direction, ejection, election, erection, genuflection, imperfection, infection, inflection, injection, inspection, insurrection, interconnection, interjection, intersection, introspection, lection, misdirection, objection, perfection, predilection, projection, protection, refection, reflection, rejection, resurrection, retrospection, section, selection, subjection, transection, vivisection •exemption, pre-emption, redemption •abstention, apprehension, ascension, attention, circumvention, comprehension, condescension, contention, contravention, convention, declension, detention, dimension, dissension, extension, gentian, hypertension, hypotension, intention, intervention, invention, mention, misapprehension, obtention, pension, prehension, prevention, recension, retention, subvention, supervention, suspension, tension •conception, contraception, deception, exception, inception, interception, misconception, perception, reception •Übermenschen • subsection •ablation, aeration, agnation, Alsatian, Amerasian, Asian, aviation, cetacean, citation, conation, creation, Croatian, crustacean, curation, Dalmatian, delation, dilation, donation, duration, elation, fixation, Galatian, gyration, Haitian, halation, Horatian, ideation, illation, lavation, legation, libation, location, lunation, mutation, natation, nation, negation, notation, nutation, oblation, oration, ovation, potation, relation, rogation, rotation, Sarmatian, sedation, Serbo-Croatian, station, taxation, Thracian, vacation, vexation, vocation, zonation •accretion, Capetian, completion, concretion, deletion, depletion, Diocletian, excretion, Grecian, Helvetian, repletion, Rhodesian, secretion, suppletion, Tahitian, venetian •academician, addition, aesthetician (US esthetician), ambition, audition, beautician, clinician, coition, cosmetician, diagnostician, dialectician, dietitian, Domitian, edition, electrician, emission, fission, fruition, Hermitian, ignition, linguistician, logician, magician, mathematician, Mauritian, mechanician, metaphysician, mission, monition, mortician, munition, musician, obstetrician, omission, optician, paediatrician (US pediatrician), patrician, petition, Phoenician, physician, politician, position, rhetorician, sedition, statistician, suspicion, tactician, technician, theoretician, Titian, tuition, volition •addiction, affliction, benediction, constriction, conviction, crucifixion, depiction, dereliction, diction, eviction, fiction, friction, infliction, interdiction, jurisdiction, malediction, restriction, transfixion, valediction •distinction, extinction, intinction •ascription, circumscription, conscription, decryption, description, Egyptian, encryption, inscription, misdescription, prescription, subscription, superscription, transcription •proscription •concoction, decoction •adoption, option •abortion, apportion, caution, contortion, distortion, extortion, portion, proportion, retortion, torsion •auction •absorption, sorption •commotion, devotion, emotion, groschen, Laotian, locomotion, lotion, motion, notion, Nova Scotian, ocean, potion, promotion •ablution, absolution, allocution, attribution, circumlocution, circumvolution, Confucian, constitution, contribution, convolution, counter-revolution, destitution, dilution, diminution, distribution, electrocution, elocution, evolution, execution, institution, interlocution, irresolution, Lilliputian, locution, perlocution, persecution, pollution, prosecution, prostitution, restitution, retribution, Rosicrucian, solution, substitution, volution •cushion • resumption • München •pincushion •Belorussian, Prussian, Russian •abduction, conduction, construction, deduction, destruction, eduction, effluxion, induction, instruction, introduction, misconstruction, obstruction, production, reduction, ruction, seduction, suction, underproduction •avulsion, compulsion, convulsion, emulsion, expulsion, impulsion, propulsion, repulsion, revulsion •assumption, consumption, gumption, presumption •luncheon, scuncheon, truncheon •compunction, conjunction, dysfunction, expunction, function, junction, malfunction, multifunction, unction •abruption, corruption, disruption, eruption, interruption •T-junction • liposuction •animadversion, aspersion, assertion, aversion, Cistercian, coercion, conversion, desertion, disconcertion, dispersion, diversion, emersion, excursion, exertion, extroversion, immersion, incursion, insertion, interspersion, introversion, Persian, perversion, submersion, subversion, tertian, version •excerption

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"extension." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"extension." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved August 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/extension