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cut / kət/ • v. (cut·ting ; past and past part. cut ) [tr.] 1. make an opening, incision, or wound in (something) with a sharp-edged tool or object: he cut his big toe on a sharp stone [intr.] fig. his scorn cut deeper than knives. 2. remove (something) from something larger by using a sharp implement: I cut his photograph out of the paper. ∎ inf. castrate (an animal, esp. a horse). ∎  (cut something out) make something by cutting: I cut out some squares of paper. ∎  (cut something out) remove, exclude, or stop eating or doing something undesirable: start today by cutting out fatty foods. ∎  (cut something out) separate an animal from the main herd. 3. divide into pieces with a knife or other sharp implement: cut the beef into thin slices. ∎  make divisions in (something): land that has been cut up by streams into forested areas. ∎  separate (something) into two; sever. ∎  (cut something down) make something, esp. a tree, fall by cutting it through at the base. ∎  (cut someone down) (of a weapon, bullet, or disease) kill or injure someone. 4. make or form (something) by using a sharp tool to remove material: workmen cut a hole in the pipe. ∎  make or design (a garment) in a particular way: [as adj.] (cut) an impeccably cut suit. ∎  make (a path, tunnel, or other route) by excavation, digging, or chopping: cut a road through a rain forest | [intr.] investigators called for a machete to cut through the bush. 5. trim or reduce the length of (something, esp. grass or a person's hair or fingernails) by using a sharp implement. 6. reduce the amount or quantity of: buyers will bargain hard to cut the cost of the house they want [intr.] the paper glut cuts into profits. ∎  abridge (a text, movie, or performance) by removing material. ∎  Comput. delete (part of a text or other display) completely or so as to insert a copy of it elsewhere. See also cut and paste. ∎  (in sports) remove (a player) from a team’s roster. ∎  end or interrupt the provision of (something, esp. power or food supplies): we resolved to cut oil supplies to territories controlled by the rebels. ∎  (cut something off) block the usual means of access to a place: the caves were cut off from the outside world. ∎  absent oneself deliberately from (something one should normally attend, esp. school): Robert was cutting class. ∎  switch off (an engine or a light). 7. (of a line) cross or intersect (another line). ∎  [intr.] (cut across) pass or traverse, esp. so as to shorten one's route: the following aircraft cut across to join him. ∎  [intr.] (cut across) have an effect regardless of (divisions or boundaries between groups): subcultures that cut across national and political boundaries. ∎  [intr.] (cut along) inf., dated leave or move hurriedly. 8. dated ignore or refuse to recognize (someone). 9. [intr. , often in imper.] stop filming or recording. ∎  move to another shot in a movie: cut to a dentist's surgery. ∎  [tr.] make (a movie) into a coherent whole by removing parts or placing them in a different order. 10. make (a sound recording). 11. divide (a pack of playing cards) by lifting a portion from the top, either to reveal or draw a card at random or to place the top portion under the bottom portion. 12. Golf slice (the ball). 13. adulterate (a drug) or dilute (alcohol) by mixing it with another substance. 14. (cut it) inf. come up to expectations; meet requirements. • n. 1. an act of cutting, in particular: ∎  [in sing.] a haircut. ∎  a stroke or blow given by a sharp-edged implement or by a whip or cane: he could skin an animal with a single cut of the knife. ∎ fig. a wounding remark or act. ∎  a reduction in amount or size: she took a 20% pay cut. ∎  (in sports) a removal of a player from a team’s roster. ∎  an act of removing part of a play, movie, or book, esp. to shorten the work or to delete offensive material: the author was willing to make cuts. ∎  an immediate transition from one scene to another in a movie. ∎ Golf the halfway point of a golf tournament where half of the players are eliminated. ∎  Tennis a stroke made with a sharp horizontal or downward action of the racket, imparting spin. 2. a result of cutting something, in particular: ∎  a long narrow incision in the skin made by something sharp. ∎  a long narrow opening or incision made in a surface or piece of material. ∎  a piece of meat cut from a carcass. ∎  [in sing.] inf. a share of the profits from something: the directors are demanding their cut. ∎  a recording of a piece of music: a cut from his album. ∎  a version of a movie after editing: the director's cut. ∎  a passage cut or dug out, as a railroad cutting or a new channel made for a river or other waterway. ∎  a woodcut. 3. [in sing.] the way or style in which something, esp. a garment or someone's hair, is cut: the elegant cut of his dinner jacket. PHRASES: be cut out for (or to be) inf. have exactly the right qualities for a particular role, task, or job: I'm just not cut out to be a policeman. a cut above inf. noticeably superior to. cut and dried (of a situation) completely settled or decided. cut and thrust Fencing the use of both the edge and the point of one’s sword while fighting. ∎  a spirited and rapid interchange of views: the cut and thrust of political debate. ∎  a situation or sphere of activity regarded as carried out under adversarial conditions. cut corners undertake something in what appears to be the easiest, quickest, or cheapest way, esp. by omitting to do something important or ignoring rules. cut a deal inf. come to an arrangement, esp. in business; make a deal. cut someone down to size inf. deflate someone's exaggerated sense of self-worth. cut something down to size reduce the size or power of something, for example an organization, that is regarded as having become too large. cut a —— figure present oneself or appear in a particular way: David has cut a dashing figure on the international social scene. cut from the same cloth of the same nature; similar. cut in line push into a line of people in order to be served or dealt with before one's turn. cut it finesee fine1 . cut it out [usu. in imper.] inf. used to ask someone to stop doing or saying something that is annoying or offensive: I'm sick of that joke; cut it out, can't you? cut loose act without restraint. cut one's losses abandon an enterprise or course of action that is clearly going to be unprofitable or unsuccessful before one suffers too much loss or harm. cut the mustard inf. come up to expectations; reach the required standard. cut someone/something short interrupt someone or something; bring an abrupt or premature end to something said or done. cut a (or the) rug inf. dance, typically in an energetic or accomplished way. cut one's teeth acquire initial practice or experience of a particular sphere of activity or with a particular organization. cut a tooth (usu.of a baby or child) have a tooth appear through the gum. cut to the chase inf. come to the point. have one's work cut outsee work. make the cut Golf avoid elimination from the last two rounds of a four-round tournament.PHRASAL VERBS: cut in 1. interrupt someone while they are speaking: “It's urgent,” Raoul cut in. ∎ dated interrupt a dancing couple to take over from one partner. 2. pull in too closely in front of another vehicle after having overtaken it. 3. (of a motor or other mechanical device) begin operating, esp. when triggered automatically by an electrical signal. 4. cut someone in inf. include someone in a deal and give them a share of the profits. cut into interrupt the course of: Victoria's words cut into her thoughts. cut someone off interrupt someone while they are speaking. ∎  interrupt someone during a telephone call by breaking the connection. ∎  prevent someone from receiving or being provided with something, esp. power or water: consumers cut off for nonpayment. ∎  reject someone as one's heir; disinherit someone. ∎  prevent someone from having access to somewhere or someone; isolate someone from something they previously had connections with: we were cut off from reality. ∎ inf. (of a driver) overtake someone and pull in too closely in front of them. cut out 1. (of a motor or engine) suddenly stop operating. 2. inf. (of a person) leave quickly, esp. so as to avoid a boring or awkward situation. cut someone out exclude someone: his mother cut him out of her will. cut up inf. behave in a mischievous or unruly manner. ORIGIN: Middle English (probably existing, although not recorded, in Old English); probably of Germanic origin and related to Norwegian kutte and Icelandic kuta ‘cut with a small knife,’ kuti ‘small blunt knife.’

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"cut." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/cut-1

cut

cut cut and run make a speedy or sudden departure from an awkward or hazardous situation rather than confront it or deal with it. Originally (in the early 18th century) a nautical phrase, meaning ‘sever the anchor cable because of some emergency and make sail immediately’.
the cut of someone's jib the appearance or look of someone. Originally a nautical expression suggested by the prominence and characteristic form of the jib (a triangular sail set forward of the foremast) as the identifying characteristic of a ship. Used in this metaphorical sense since the early 19th century.
cut the mustard chiefly in North America, succeed; come up to expectations, meet requirements; mustard means the real thing, the genuine article.
cut to the chase come to the point (North American usage). Cut here is in the sense ‘move to another part of the film’, expressing the notion of ignoring any preliminaries and coming immediately to the most important part.
cut your coat according to your cloth actions taken should suit one's circumstances or resources; saying recorded from the mid 16th century.
don't cut off your nose to spite your face warning against spiteful revenge which is likely to result in your own hurt or loss. Recorded in English from the mid 16th century, but a related medieval Latin saying has, ‘he who cuts off his nose takes poor revenge for a shame inflicted on him,’ and a French saying of the mid 14th century runs, ‘the man who cuts off his nose spites his face.’

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cut

cut
1. To mark a piece of text or graphical information in some way, read it into a temporary storage location, and delete it from the original document. The information may then be inserted into a new location. This has the effect of moving the information from one location to another and is often called a move, or cut and paste by analogy with scissors and glue techniques. See clipboard. Compare copy.

2. A mechanism used in Prolog to limit backtracking. Roughly speaking, the effect of a cut is to fix certain decisions that have already been made, thus preventing the system from undoing those decisions in order to perform a further search for solutions to its goals. This is a way of avoiding costly search known in advance to be fruitless, or of excluding alternative solutions that are not wanted. However, writing cuts in a program makes its behavior dependent on the system's search sequence. Such dependency prevents the program from being a pure statement of logical relationships and thus goes against the spirit of logic programming.

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"cut." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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cut

cut 2 make a way with an edged instrument into (an object). XIII. The earlier dial. vars. cutte, kitte, kette point to an OE. *cyttan, f. *kut- cf. Norw. kutte, Icel. kuta cut with a little knife, kuti sb. little blunt knife).
Hence cut sb. XVI.

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cut

cut 1 lot, in phr. draw cuts formerly cut. XIII. of unkn. orig.

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cut

cutabut, but, butt, cut, glut, gut, hut, intercut, jut, Mut, mutt, nut, phut, putt, rut, scut, shortcut, shut, slut, smut, strut, tut, undercut •sackbut • scuttlebutt • catgut •midgut • Vonnegut • rotgut • haircut •offcut • cross-cut • linocut • crew cut •woodcut • uppercut • chestnut •hazelnut • peanut • wing nut • cobnut •locknut • walnut • groundnut •doughnut (US donut) • coconut •butternut

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