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close1 / klōs/ • adj. 1. a short distance away or apart in space or time: the hotel is close to the sea. ∎  with very little or no space in between; dense: cloth with a closer weave. ∎  (close to) very near to (being or doing something): she was close to tears. ∎  (of a competitive situation) won or likely to be won by only a small amount or distance. ∎  (of a final position in a competition) very near to the competitor immediately in front: she finished a close second. ∎  narrowly enclosed: animals in close confinement. ∎  (of hair or grass) very short or near the surface: the ground will need to be level enough to allow close mowing. ∎  Phonet. another term for high (sense 7). 2. denoting a family member who is part of a person's immediate family, typically a parent or sibling. ∎  (of a person or relationship) on very affectionate or intimate terms. ∎  (of a connection or resemblance) strong: the college has close links with many other institutions. 3. (of observation, examination, etc.) done in a careful and thorough way: pay close attention to what your body is telling you about yourself. ∎  carefully guarded: his whereabouts are a close secret. ∎  not willing to give away money or information; secretive. ∎  following faithfully an original or model: the debate about close or free translation. 4. uncomfortably humid or airless. • adv. in a position so as to be very near to someone or something; with very little space between: they stood close to the door he was holding her close. PHRASES: close by very near; nearby: her father lives quite close by. close to (or close on) (of an amount) almost; very nearly. close to the bonesee bone. close to one's heartsee heart. close to homesee home. close up very near: close up she was no less pretty. close to the wind Sailing (of a sailing vessel) pointed as near as possible to the direction from which the wind is blowing while still making headway. come close almost achieve or do: he came close to calling the President a liar. too close for comfort dangerously or uncomfortably near: the friendly stranger who suddenly comes too close for comfort.DERIVATIVES: close·ly adv. close·ness n. clos·ish adj. close2 / klōz/ • v. 1. move or cause to move so as to cover an opening: [intr.] she jumped into the train just as the doors were closing | [tr.] they had to close the window because of the insects. ∎  [tr.] block up (a hole or opening): glass doors close off the living room from the hall. ∎  [tr.] bring two parts of (something) together so as to block its opening or bring it into a folded state: Ron closed the book. ∎  [intr.] gradually get nearer to someone or something: a large group of aircraft about 130 miles away and closing fast. ∎  [intr.] (close around/over) come into contact with (something) so as to encircle and hold it: my fist closed around the weapon. ∎  [tr.] make (an electric circuit) continuous: this will cause a relay to operate and close the circuit. 2. bring or come to an end: [tr.] the members were thanked for attending, and the meeting was closed | [intr.] the concert closed with “Silent Night.” ∎  [intr.] (of a business, organization, or institution) cease to be in operation or accessible to the public, either permanently or at the end of a working day or other period of time: the factory is to close | [tr.] the country has been closed to outsiders for almost 50 years. ∎  [intr.] finish speaking or writing: we close with a point about truth. ∎  [tr.] bring (a business transaction) to a satisfactory conclusion: he closed a deal with a metal dealer. ∎  [tr.] remove all the funds from (a bank account) and cease to use it. ∎  [tr.] Comput. make (a data file) inaccessible after use, so that it is securely stored until required again. • n. [in sing.] 1. the end of an event or of a period of time or activity: the afternoon drew to a close. ∎  (the close) the end of a day's trading on a stock market: at the close the Dow Jones average was down 13.52 points. ∎  Mus. the conclusion of a phrase; a cadence. 2. the shutting of something, esp. a door. PHRASES: close the door on (or to) see door. close one's eyes tosee eye. close one's mind tosee mind. close rankssee rank1 . close up shopsee shop.PHRASAL VERBS: close something down (or close down) cause to cease or cease business or operation, esp. permanently. close in (on) come nearer to someone being pursued: the police were closing in on them. ∎  gradually surround, esp. with the effect of hindering movement or vision: the weather has now closed in, so an attempt on the summit is unlikely. close something up (or close up) 1. cause to cease or cease operation or being used: the broker advised me to close the house up for the time being. 2. (close up) (of an opening) grow smaller or become blocked by something: she felt her throat close up. DERIVATIVES: clos·a·ble adj. clos·er n.

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"close." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"close." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/close-1

close

close Close Encounter a supposed encounter with a UFO, and divided into categories, from a Close Encounter of the First Kind (sighting but no physical evidence), through Second (physical evidence left) and Third (extra-terrestrials beings observed) to a Close Encounter of the Fourth Kind, which involves abduction by aliens. The expression was popularized by the science-fiction film Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977).
close season a period between specified dates when fishing or the killing of particular game is officially forbidden.

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"close." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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close

close To instruct an application that a file is no longer required. When a file is closed, any changes that have been made can be committed to disk, and the file may be released so that other applications can use it. In some cases an entirely new version of the file will be created and the previous version discarded, or renamed in such a way as to make clear that it is a backup version. See also open.

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"close." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Close

CLOSE

A parcel of land that is surrounded by a boundary of some kind, such as a hedge or a fence. To culminate, complete, finish, or bring to an end. To seal up. To restrict to a certain class. A narrow margin, as in a close election.

A person can close a bank account; a trial may be closed after each lawyer has concluded his or her presentation in the case at bar.

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"Close." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Close." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/close

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close

close sb. enclosed space, enclosure XIII; adj. closed, shut up XIV. — (O)F. clos :- L. clausus, pp. of claudere shut, close.
So close vb. stop an opening. XIII. f. clos-, ppl. stem of (O)F. clore :- L. claudere.

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"close." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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close

close.
1. Court, quad, or yard.

2. Precinct of a cathedral.

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"close." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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close

close. The same as cadence.

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"close." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"close." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/close

close

closeappose, arose, Bose, brose, chose, close, compose, diagnose, doze, enclose, expose, foreclose, froze, hose, impose, interpose, juxtapose, Montrose, noes, nose, oppose, plainclothes, pose, propose, prose, rose, suppose, those, transpose, underexpose, uprose •Berlioz • flambeaux • thrombose •bandeaux • bulldoze • fricandeaux •metamorphose • pantyhose • glucose •gallows, Hallowes •tableaux • parclose • Fellows •bedclothes • nightclothes • rouleaux •underclothes • misdiagnose •Ambrose • dextrose • Faeroes •primrose • cornrows • sucrose •Burroughs • tuberose •bateaux, gateaux, plateaux •portmanteaux • fructose

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"close." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"close." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/close-0