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bounce

bounce / bouns/ • v. [intr.] (of an object, esp. a ball) move quickly away from a surface after hitting it; rebound: the ball bounced off the rim [tr.] he was bouncing the ball against the wall. ∎  rebound repeatedly: the ball bounced away, and he chased it. ∎  (of light, sound, or an electronic signal) come into contact with an object or surface and be reflected: short sound waves bounce off even small objects. ∎  (of a thing) move up and down while remaining essentially in the same position: the gangplank bounced under his confident step. ∎  (of a person) jump repeatedly up and down, typically on something springy: bouncing up and down on the mattress. ∎  [tr.] cause (a child) to move lightly up and down on one's knee as a game: I remember how you used to bounce me on your knee. ∎  move in an energetic or happy manner: Linda bounced in through the open front door. ∎  (of a vehicle) move jerkily along a bumpy surface: the car bounced down the narrow track. ∎  (bounce back) fig. recover well after a setback: admired for his ability to bounce back from injury. ∎  Baseball hit a ball that bounces before reaching a fielder: bouncing out with the bases loaded [tr.] bounced a grounder to third. ∎  inf. (of a check) be returned by a bank when there are insufficient funds to meet it: my rent check bounced. ∎  [tr.] inf. write (a check) on insufficient funds. ∎  [tr.] inf. eject (a troublemaker) forcibly from a nightclub or similar establishment. • n. a rebound of a ball or other object: a bad bounce caused the ball to get away from the second baseman. ∎  an act of jumping or an instance of being moved up and down: every bounce of the truck brought them into fresh contact. ∎  a sudden rise in the level of something: economists agree that there could be a bounce in prices next year. ∎  exuberant self-confidence: the bounce was now back in Jenny's step. PHRASES: be bouncing off the walls inf. be full of nervous excitement or agitation.

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"bounce." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"bounce." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bounce-0

"bounce." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bounce-0

bounce

bounce First in the vb. (bunsen †beat, thump XIII); the application to loud explosive noise, blustering, and bounding like a ball appears in vb., sb., and int. in early XVI; poss. from LG., but perh. of independent imit. orig.

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"bounce." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"bounce." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bounce-1

"bounce." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bounce-1

bounce

bounce Informal The return of an e-mail message to the original sender when it is not possible to deliver the message, usually because the name of the putative recipient of the e-mail is not known to the receiving system.

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"bounce." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"bounce." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bounce

"bounce." A Dictionary of Computing. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bounce

bounce

bounceaskance, expanse, finance, Hans, Hanse, manse, nance, Penzance, Romance •underpants • happenstance •advance, Afrikaans, à outrance, chance, dance, enhance, entrance, faience, France, glance, lance, mischance, outdance, perchance, prance, Provence, stance, trance •nuance • tap-dance • square dance •freelance • convenance •cense, commence, common sense, condense, dense, dispense, expense, fence, hence, Hortense, immense, offence (US offense), pence, prepense, pretence (US pretense), sense, spence, suspense, tense, thence, whence •ring-fence • recompense •frankincense •chintz, convince, evince, Linz, mince, Port-au-Prince, prince, quince, rinse, since, Vince, wince •province •bonce, ensconce, nonce, ponce, response, sconce •séance • pièce de résistance •announce, bounce, denounce, flounce, fluid ounce, jounce, mispronounce, ounce, pounce, pronounce, renounce, trounce •dunce, once

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"bounce." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"bounce." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bounce

"bounce." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bounce