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resin

resin, any of a class of amorphous solids or semisolids. Resins are found in nature and are chiefly of vegetable origin. They are typically light yellow to dark brown in color; tasteless; odorless or faintly aromatic; translucent or transparent; brittle, fracturing like glass; and flammable, burning with a smoky flame. Resins are soluble in alcohol, ether, and many hydrocarbons but are insoluble in water. When heated, they soften and finally melt. Their chemical composition varies, but most are mixtures of organic acids and esters. Resins are generally classified according to their source or by such qualities as hardness or solubility. Natural resins are found as exudations, often as globules or tears, on the bark of various trees (mostly pines and firs) or on other living plants; they also occur as fossils or as exudations from the bodies of certain scale insects (see lac). Some natural resins, called oleoresins, contain both a resin and an essential oil; they are often viscid, sticky, gummy, or plastic. Other resins are exceedingly hard and resistant to most solvents, softening only at high temperatures. The primary uses for most resins are in varnish, shellac, and lacquer, in medicine, in molded articles (e.g., pipe mouthpieces), and in electrical insulators. See amber; balsam; benzoin; Canada balsam; copaiba; dragon's blood; mastic; rosin; turpentine.

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"resin." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 13 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"resin." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 13, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/resin

"resin." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved December 13, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/resin

resin

res·in / ˈrezən/ • n. a sticky flammable organic substance, insoluble in water, exuded by some trees and other plants (notably fir and pine).Compare with gum1 (sense 1). ∎  (also syn·the·tic res·in) a solid or liquid synthetic organic polymer used as the basis of plastics, adhesives, varnishes, or other products. • v. (res·ined, res·in·ing) [tr.] [usu. as adj.] (resined) rub or treat with resin: resined canvas. DERIVATIVES: res·in·ous / ˈrezənəs/ adj.

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"resin." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 13 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"resin." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 13, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/resin-0

"resin." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved December 13, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/resin-0

resin

resin (rosin) Artificial or natural polymer that is generally viscous and sticky. Artificial resins include polyesters and epoxies and are used as adhesives and binders. Natural resins are secreted by various plants. Oleoresin, secreted by conifers, is distilled to produce turpentine; rosin remains after the oil of turpentine has been distilled off.

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"resin." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 13 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"resin." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 13, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/resin

"resin." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved December 13, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/resin

resin

resin An exudate of tree wood or bark, liquid but becoming solid on exposure, consisting of a complex of terpenes and similar compounds. It is characteristic of some families, e.g. Dipterocarpaceae, or groups, e.g. the conifers. In many cases it is of economic value for varnishes, etc. It is produced in specialized cells.

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"resin." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 13 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"resin." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 13, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/resin

"resin." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Retrieved December 13, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/resin

resin

resin A naturally occurring acidic polymer secreted by many trees (especially conifers) into ducts or canals. Resins are found either as brittle glassy substances or dissolved in essential oils. Their functions are probably similar to those of gums and mucilages, i.e. protective.

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"resin." A Dictionary of Biology. . Encyclopedia.com. 13 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"resin." A Dictionary of Biology. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 13, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/resin-0

"resin." A Dictionary of Biology. . Retrieved December 13, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/resin-0

resin

resin, rosin adhesive substance secreted by plants. XIV. ME. recyn, resyn, rosyn, rosine — L. resīna and medL. rosīna, of unkn. orig.
So resinous XVII. — F. — L.

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"resin." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 13 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"resin." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 13, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/resin-1

"resin." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved December 13, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/resin-1

resinous

resinous Of a mineral lustre, translucent yellowish to brown.

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"resinous." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 13 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"resinous." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 13, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/resinous

"resinous." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Retrieved December 13, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/resinous

resinous

resinous •pandanus •badness, madness, sadness •Magnus • aptness •fatness, patness •redness • wetness •anus, Coriolanus, heinous, Janus, Punta Arenas, Silvanusgenus, intravenous, Maecenas, Malvinas, Salinas, venous, Venus •Cygnus • proteinous • ruinous •libidinous •multitudinous, platitudinous, pulchritudinous, vicissitudinous •cartilaginous, farraginous, oleaginous •fuliginous, indigenous, oxygenous, polygynous, rubiginous, vertiginous •androgynous, autogenous, endogenous, erogenous, exogenous, homogenous, hydrogenous, misogynous •ferruginous • ominous •bituminous, leguminous, luminous, numinous, voluminous •conterminous, coterminous, terminus, verminous •larcenous • gelatinous • cretinous •mountainous •glutinous, mutinous •resinous •Aquinas, Delphinus, echinus, Linus, Longinus, minus, Plotinus, sinus, vinous •oddness • wanness • hotness •Faunus, rawness •Kaunas •bonus, Cronus, Jonas, lowness, onus, Tithonus •oldness •newness, twoness •fulness •alumnus, rumness •oneness • Oceanus • Eridanus •diaphanous • polyphonous •cacophonous, homophonous •porcellanous • villainous •membranous • tyrannous •synchronous • Uranus • tetanus •monotonous • gluttonous •cavernous, ravenous •treasonous • poisonous • Avernus

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"resinous." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 13 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"resinous." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 13, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/resinous

"resinous." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved December 13, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/resinous