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Ice

Ice

Ice is frozen water , or in other words, water in solid state. Ice is a transparent, colorless substance with some special properties; it floats in water, ice expands when water freezes, and its melting point decreases with increasing pressure. Water is the only substance that exists in all three phases as gas, liquid, and solid under normal circumstances on Earth.

Water, and thus ice molecules, consist of one oxygen and two hydrogen atoms. Water is a polar molecule, with a slight negative charge on the oxygen side, and a slight positive charge on the hydrogen side, which makes it possible to interact with other polar molecules or ions. Thus, a loose chemical connection called a hydrogen bond forms between the water molecules, where each water molecule can bind to other water molecules, forming a complex network. These hydrogen bonds are the main reason for the special properties of water and ice.

Water in the solid state forms a highly ordered hexagonal (six-sided) crystal lattice structure, because it is the most stable arrangement of the water molecules. Although the individual molecules can vibrate, they cannot move fast enough to leave the crystal structure, since the opposite electrical polarities hold them together. This lattice crystal can be visualized as layers of hexagonal rings of the oxygen atoms stacked on each other. Ice has eleven known crystal forms, depending on pressure, temperature , or how quickly the ice forms. Ice cannot form from liquid water at the freezing point, unless there are seeds for the crystal, which dissipate the energy of the colliding water molecules, keeping them locked in the lattice structure. If no seeds are present, spontaneous crystal nucleation begins only if the water is supercooled below the freezing point.

Ice is present in nature in many places and in many forms: icebergs , ice sheets, glaciers , snow, freezing rain, sleet, ice crystals , icicles, hail, rime, graupel, and ice fog . Ice plays an important role in erosion (water fills the cracks of rock , freezes, expands, and breaks the rock), and in atmospheric

energy transport (when water vapor changes into liquid or ice, latent heat is released). The way ice forms in bodies of water (not from the bottom up, but from the top down) protects many organisms in the water from very cold and fast temperature fluctuations.

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ice

ice / īs/ • n. frozen water, a brittle, transparent crystalline solid: the pipes were blocked with ice. ∎  a frozen mixture of fruit juice or flavored water and sugar. ∎ inf. diamonds. ∎ fig. complete absence of friendliness or affection in manner or expression: the ice in his voice was only to hide the pain. ∎ inf. an illegal profit made from scalping tickets. ∎ inf. money paid in graft or bribery. ∎ inf. methamphetamine. • v. [tr.] 1. decorate (a cake) with icing. 2. inf. clinch (something such as a victory or deal). 3. inf. kill: a man had been iced by the police. 4. Ice Hockey shoot (the puck) so as to commit icing. PHRASES: break the ice do or say something to relieve tension or get conversation going at the start of a party or when people meet for the first time. on ice 1. (of wine or food) kept chilled by being surrounded by ice. ∎ fig. (esp. of a plan or proposal) held in reserve for future consideration: the recommendation was put on ice. 2. (of an entertainment) performed by skaters: Cinderella on Ice. on thin ice in a precarious or risky situation: you're skating on thin ice.PHRASAL VERBS: ice over (of water or an object) become completely covered with ice. ice up (of an object) become coated with or blocked by ice.

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"ice." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 28 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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ice

ice Water which has frozen into a crystal lattice. Pure water freezes at 0°C at 1013.24 mb pressure. The presence of salts in solution depresses the freezing point of water. Liquid water has its maximum density at 4°C, in consequence of which ice floats on water. With increasing pressure, a series of denser polymorphs of ice forms, each designated by a Roman numeral, ordinary ice being ice I. Expansion on freezing (9.05 per cent in specific volume) generates very high pressures, which bring about frost wedging. Such ice I converts into the denser ice III at lower temperatures, but the pressure exerted by it changes little. ‘Ground ice’ forms when interstitial water freezes, and this may bring about heaving as well as frost wedging. ‘Glacier ice’ is a relatively opaque mass of interlocking crystals, and has a density of 0.85–0.91 g/cm. ‘Regelation ice’ is relatively clear and is formed by the freezing of meltwater beneath a temperate glacier.

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"ice." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. 28 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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ice

ice OE. īs = OS., OHG. īs (Du. ijs, G. eis), ON. íss :- Gmc. *īsam, *īsaz, rel. to AV. isu- icy. Ice cream (XVIII) is for earlier iced cream (XVII).
Hence icy XVI (not continuous with OE. īsiġ). So iceberg †Arctic glacier; detached portion of this in the sea. XVIII. prob. — (M)Du. ijsberg (see BARROW1).

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"ice." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 28 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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ice

ice break the ice do or say something to relieve tension or get conversation going in a strained situation or when strangers meet.
Ice Age the series of glacial episodes during the Pleistocene period.
on thin ice in a precarious or risky situation.

See also the rich man has his ice in the summer.

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ice

ice Water frozen to 0°C (32°F) or below, when it forms complex six-sided crystals. It is less dense than water. When water vapour condenses below freezing point, ice crystals form. Clusters of crystals form snowflakes. See also glacier

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ICE

ICE • abbr. internal combustion engine.

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ICE

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ice

ice
1. Water which has frozen into a crystal lattice. Pure water freezes at 0°C at 1013.24 mb pressure. The presence of salts in solution depresses the freezing point of water. Liquid water has its maximum density at 4°C, in consequence of which ice floats on water. With increasing pressure, a series of denser polymorphs of ice forms, each designated by a Roman numeral, ordinary ice being ice I.

2. Several properties and varieties of ice are important in geomorphological processes. Expansion on freezing (9.05% in specific volume) generates very high pressures. In an enclosed space in the laboratory the pressure reaches 216 MPa (megapascals) at −22°C but reaches only about 10% of this when unenclosed, as in nature. The stresses are, however, sufficient to bring about frost wedging. Such ice I converts into the denser ice III at lower temperatures, but the pressure exerted by it changes little. ‘Ground ice’ forms when interstitial water freezes, and this may bring about heaving as well as frost wedging. ‘Glacier ice’ is a relatively opaque mass of interlocking crystals, and has a density of 0.85–0.91 g/cm3. ‘Regelation ice’ is relatively clear and is formed by the freezing of meltwater beneath a temperate glacier.

3. In planetary geology other ices are important. Water ice condenses at 160 K at solar nebular pressures and appears in abundance forming the surfaces of the Galilean satellites Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. The satellites of the jovian planets are mostly water ice—rock mixtures. Water ice will exist in high-pressure polymorphs (e.g. ice VIII, density 1670 kg/m3) above about 15–20 kb in satellite interiors. Other possible ices important in satellites (e.g. Titan) include NH3.H2O, CH4.nH2O, and H2O.CO2.

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ice

ice: see water.

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ice

iceadvice, bice, Brice, choc ice, concise, dice, entice, gneiss, ice, imprecise, lice, mice, nice, precise, price, rice, sice, slice, speiss, spice, splice, suffice, syce, thrice, trice, twice, underprice, vice, Zeiss •merchandise • paradise • sacrifice •packice • woodlice • fieldmice •titmice • dormice • allspice •cockatrice • edelweiss

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