Skip to main content
Select Source:

suspension

sus·pen·sion / səˈspenshən/ • n. 1. the action of suspending someone or something or the condition of being suspended, in particular: ∎  the temporary prevention of something from continuing or being in force or effect: the suspension of military action. ∎  the official prohibition of someone from holding their usual post or carrying out their usual role for a particular length of time: the investigation led to the suspension of several officers | a four-game suspension. ∎  Mus. a discord made by prolonging a note of a chord into the following chord. 2. the system of springs and shock absorbers by which a vehicle is cushioned from road conditions: the car's rear suspension. 3. a mixture in which particles are dispersed throughout the bulk of a fluid: a suspension of corn starch in peanut oil. ∎  the state of being dispersed in such a way: the agitator in the vat keeps the slurry in suspension.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"suspension." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"suspension." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/suspension-0

"suspension." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved December 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/suspension-0

suspension (in chemistry)

suspension, in chemistry, mixture of two substances, one of which is finely divided and dispersed in the other. Common suspensions include sand in water, fine soot or dust in air, and droplets of oil in air. A suspension is different from a colloid or solution. Particles in a suspension are larger than those in colloids or solutions; they are visible under a microscope, and some can be seen with the naked eye. Particles in a suspension precipitate if the suspension is allowed to stand undisturbed.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"suspension (in chemistry)." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"suspension (in chemistry)." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/suspension-chemistry

"suspension (in chemistry)." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved December 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/suspension-chemistry

suspension

suspension Liquid (or gas) medium in which small solid (or liquid) particles are uniformly dispersed. The particles are larger than those found in a colloid and will settle if the suspension stands undisturbed.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"suspension." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"suspension." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/suspension

"suspension." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved December 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/suspension