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flame

flame / flām/ • n. 1. a hot glowing body of ignited gas that is generated by something on fire: the flame of a candle | a sheet of flame blocked my escape. 2. fig. used in similes and metaphors to refer to something resembling a flame in various respects, in particular: ∎  a thing resembling a flame in heat, shape, or brilliance: red and yellow bunting fluttering like flames in the breeze. ∎  a brilliant orange-red color: [in comb.] a flame-red trench coat. ∎  a thing compared to a flame's ability to burn fiercely or be extinguished: the flame of hope burns brightly here. ∎  a very intense emotion: the sound of his laughter fanned the flame of anger to new heights. ∎  a cause that generates passionate feelings: her father had been keeper of the formalist flame. ∎  Comput. a vitriolic or abusive message sent via electronic mail, typically in quick response to another message: flames about inexperienced users posting stupid messages. • v. [intr.] burn and give off flames: a great fire flamed in an open fireplace. ∎  [tr.] set (something) alight: warm the whiskey slightly, pour over the lobster, and flame it. ∎ fig. shine or glow like a flame: her thick hair flamed against the light. ∎ fig. (of an intense emotion) appear suddenly and fiercely: hope flamed in her. ∎  (of a person's face) suddenly become red with intense emotion, esp. anger or embarrassment: Jess's cheeks flamed. ∎  [tr.] Comput. send (someone) abusive or vitriolic electronic mail messages, typically in a quick exchange. PHRASES: burst into flame (or flames) suddenly begin to burn fiercely: the grass looked ready to burst into flame. go up in flames be destroyed by fire: last night two factories went up in flames. in flames on fire; burning fiercely: the plane plunged to the ground in flames. old flame inf. a former lover.PHRASAL VERBS: flame out (of a jet engine) lose power through the extinction of the flame in the combustion chamber. ∎ inf. fail, esp. conspicuously: journalists had seared him for flaming out in the second round of the Olympics. DERIVATIVES: flame·less adj. flame·like / -ˌlīk/ adj. flam·er n. ( Comput. ). flam·y / ˈflāmē/ adj.

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"flame." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"flame." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 19, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/flame-0

"flame." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 19, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/flame-0

flame

flame, phenomenon associated with the chemical reaction of a gas that has been heated above its kindling temperature with some other gas, usually atmospheric oxygen (see combustion). The heat and light given off are characteristic of the specific chemical reaction (or reactions) going on; the luminosity of the flame is usually caused by solid particles of foreign matter present (naturally or artificially) in the burning gas and heated to incandescence; and the shape of the flame is commonly that of a hollow cone. The simple flame occurring when a single gas, such as hydrogen, burns in another gas, such as air, shows two areas, or zones: an inner, cone-shaped area consisting of unburned gas; and an outer area in which the chemical reaction (the combination of hydrogen and oxygen to form water) is taking place. Furthermore, the flame is nonluminous and therefore very hot, since the chemical energy is nearly all transformed into heat energy. This reaction is illustrated in the flame of the oxyhydrogen blowpipe. The flame of the oxyacetylene torch is also extremely hot. A decrease in light with an increase in heat is brought about in the Bunsen burner flame (a more complex flame) by mixing the combustible gas with air before it is ignited. Flames become more complex as the combustible gas increases in complexity, since an increasing number of chemical reactions are involved. Three zones, for example, are apparent in the Bunsen burner flame: an inner zone of unburned gas; a middle zone called the reduction zone or reducing flame, since there the supply of oxygen is deficient and the oxygen is therefore removed from an oxide placed in it; and an outer, or oxidizing, zone. The candle flame is extremely complex. Several zones can be observed: a nonluminous inner portion where the melted wax produces gases; a middle area where the gases are decomposed to hydrogen, which burns, and carbon, which is heated to incandescence; and an outer, hardly visible region in which combustion is complete (carbon dioxide and water being formed). Flames are colored by the introduction of various substances, a fact utilized in the flame test for the identification of certain metals.

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"flame." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"flame." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 19, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/flame

"flame." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved August 19, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/flame

flaming

flam·ing / ˈflāming/ • adj. 1. burning fiercely and emitting flames: they dragged her away from the flaming car. ∎  very hot: flaming June. ∎  glowing with a bright orange or red color: the flaming autumn maples of the St. Lawrence River valley. ∎  (of red or orange) brilliant or intense: flaming red hair. ∎  (esp. of an argument) passionate: Gloria's suddenly flaming jealousy. 2. inf. used for emphasis to express annoyance: weeds can become a flaming nuisance. DERIVATIVES: flam·ing·ly adv.

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"flaming." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"flaming." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 19, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/flaming

"flaming." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 19, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/flaming

flame

flame Informal
1. An angry or abusive e-mail message from one user to another.

2. A flood of e-mail messages from a large group of users to one specific user, who is judged to have offended against some standard of decent behavior. The individual messages may each be angry or abusive, but in some cases the actual messages may have no real purpose other than to overload the recipient's system, typically by sending as a mail message the entire contents of some very large data set such as the text of all the help files on a system.

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"flame." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"flame." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 19, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/flame

"flame." A Dictionary of Computing. . Retrieved August 19, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/flame

flame

flame sb. XIV. ME. flaume, flam(m)e — AN. *flaume, OF. flame, (also mod.) flamme :- L. flamma, f. base repr. by FLAGRANT.
So as vb. XIV. — OF. flam(m)er.

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"flame." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"flame." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 19, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/flame-1

"flame." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved August 19, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/flame-1

flame

flameacclaim, aflame, aim, became, blame, came, claim, dame, exclaim, fame, flame, frame, game, lame, maim, misname, name, proclaim, same, shame, tame •endgame • counterclaim • nickname •byname • filename • forename •surname • airframe • mainframe •Ephraim • doorframe • subframe •underframe • aspartame

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"flame." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"flame." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 19, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/flame

"flame." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved August 19, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/flame