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Wildlife Biologist

Wildlife Biologist

A career in wildlife biology may consist of conducting research through a university, zoo, or science museum or of working for the government or private corporations. When based out of an academic organization, wildlife biologists dedicate their time to modeling the lives and interactions of particular species or particular environments. Governmental wildlife biologists make recommendations on new legislation that may affect the survival of endangered animals or environments. Wildlife management administrators oversee the running of state and national parks. Governments of countries that strongly rely on ecotourism employ wildlife biologists and environmental technicians to create tourist-friendly parks or to reconstruct environments that were damaged in the past. In work for business and corporations, wildlife biologists test the effects of factory pollutants on the environment, advise businesses on where to build new structures, and sometimes actively monitor wildlife preserves located on corporation property.

Wildlife biologists must be able to calculate and predict population sizes, migration patterns, birth and death rates, and environmental interactions, all of which necessitate a strong background in mathematics, physics, and computer science. Most positions offered in this field require a strong background in natural sciences, with a graduate degree in wildlife biology or fishery. Recommended course work includes habitat design, wild bird management, large mammal conservation, wildlife ecology , and fisheries ecology. Courses in wild animal veterinary science may also be valuable for some positions. To pursue a career in wildlife biology, it is best to begin early: volunteer at a local zoo, veterinary clinic, or landscaping firm. Seek out wildlife researchers from among college professors and offer to help them with their research. In addition to mathematics and science classes, take classes in public speaking, economics, or political science. A bachelor's degree can be followed by graduate studies, and by volunteer or salaried work in a national park.

Rebecca M. Steinberg

Bibliography

Leopold, Aldo. Game Management. Boulder, CO: Johnson Books, 2000.

Maynard, Thane, and Jane Goodall. Working with Wildlife: A Guide to Careers in the Animal World. New York: Franklin Watts, 1999.

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"Wildlife Biologist." Animal Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Wildlife Biologist

Wildlife Biologist

Wildlife biologists are scientists who study wild animals to understand how they interact with other animals and their habitat. They may also manipulate wildlife populations and their habitats (for instance, by planting food sources) in an effort to conserve these valuable resources. The job of a wildlife biologist involves a variety of outdoor activities such as observing, capturing, and measuring animals, or measuring and manipulating their habitats. An equally important part of the job involves developing management plans; collecting and analyzing data; documenting activities; and communicating with other professionals and the public. Private landowners occasionally hire wildlife biologists, but most are employed by federal or state fish and game agencies (e.g. Fish and Wildlife Service, Forest Service). In addition to a solid foundation in biology, a wildlife biologist needs a good background in chemistry and mathematics (especially statistics), and must be able to communicate clearly both orally and in writing. Anyone interested in a career as a wildlife biologist should earn a bachelor's degree in Wildlife Management and should also gain experience through part-time or seasonal employment in the field. Opportunities for career advancement are significantly enhanced by earning a master's degree and those individuals interested in research should consider acquiring a doctoral degree (Ph.D.).

see also Biodiversity; Conservation; Zoology; Zoology Researcher

John H. Roese

Bibliography

Anderson, Stanley H. Managing Our Wildlife Resources, 3rd ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1999.

Leopold, Aldo. A Sand County Almanac. New York: Oxford University Press, 1949.

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"Wildlife Biologist." Biology. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Wildlife Biologist." Biology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/news-wires-white-papers-and-books/wildlife-biologist

"Wildlife Biologist." Biology. . Retrieved August 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/news-wires-white-papers-and-books/wildlife-biologist