Skip to main content
Select Source:

suppressor mutation

suppressor mutation (suppressor) In genetics, a second mutation that masks the phenotypic effects of an earlier mutation. This second mutation occurs at a different site in the genome (i.e. it is not a strict reversion). Intragenic suppression results from a second mutation that corrects the functioning of the mutant gene (e.g. a mutation of a different nucleotide in the same triplet, such that the codon then encodes the original amino acid). Intergenic suppression results from mutation of a different gene, the product of which compensates for the dysfunction in the first (e.g. a mutation that produces a mutant transfer-RNA molecule that inserts an amino acid in response to a nonsense codon, thus continuing a protein that would otherwise have been terminated). If a single suppressor mutation can suppress more than one existing mutation, it is said to be a supersuppressor. Compare REVERSE MUTATION.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"suppressor mutation." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 13 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"suppressor mutation." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 13, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/suppressor-mutation

"suppressor mutation." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Retrieved December 13, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/suppressor-mutation

suppressor mutation

suppressor mutation In genetics, a second mutation that masks the phenotypic effects of an earlier mutation. This second mutation occurs at a different site in the genome (i.e. it is not a strict reverse mutation); ‘intragenic suppression’ results from a second mutation that corrects the functioning of the mutant gene (e.g. a mutation of a different nucleotide in the same triplet, such that the codon then encodes the original amino acid); ‘intergenic suppression’ results from mutation of a different gene, the product of which compensates for the dysfunction in the first (e.g. a mutation that produces a mutant transfer-RNA molecule that inserts an amino acid in response to a nonsense codon, thus continuing a protein that would otherwise have been terminated). If a single suppressor mutation can suppress more than one existing mutation, it is said to be a supersuppressor.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"suppressor mutation." A Dictionary of Zoology. . Encyclopedia.com. 13 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"suppressor mutation." A Dictionary of Zoology. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 13, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/suppressor-mutation-0

"suppressor mutation." A Dictionary of Zoology. . Retrieved December 13, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/suppressor-mutation-0