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conodonts

conodonts Small, phosphatic, fossil teeth, common in rocks from the Cambrian to Triassic (and formerly placed in the category Conodontophora) that belonged to elongated, fish-like animals that were probably chordates (Chordata), possibly vertebrates, and lived as active predators. Two eyes were located in lobe-shaped structures at the anterior end, a notochord ran down the length of the worm-shaped body, there were muscular fins at the posterior end, and the feeding apparatus comprised the only hard parts.

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"conodonts." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"conodonts." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/conodonts

"conodonts." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/conodonts

conodonts

conodonts Small, phosphatic, fossil teeth, common in rocks from the Cambrian to Triassic (and formerly placed in the category Conodontophora), that belonged to elongated, fish-like animals closely related to the vertebrates.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

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"conodonts." A Dictionary of Zoology. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"conodonts." A Dictionary of Zoology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/conodonts-0

"conodonts." A Dictionary of Zoology. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/conodonts-0