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daisy

daisy [O.E.,=day's eye], name for several common wildflowers of the family Asteraceae (aster family). The daisy of literature, the true daisy, is Bellis perennis, called in the United States English daisy. This is a low European plant, cultivated in the United States mostly in the double form, with heads of white, pink, or red flowers. The English daisy, which closes at night, has long been considered the flower of children and of innocence. A purple species native to the lower Mississippi basin is called Western daisy (Astranthum or Bellis integrifolium). The common, often weedy, daisy of the United States (Chrysanthemum leucanthemum), called also white, or oxeye, daisy, is native to Europe but naturalized in America. The white daisy is one of the plants named marguerite, but the usual marguerite in cultivation is C. frutescens, a bushy perennial with white or lemon-yellow flowers, native to the Canary Islands and called also Paris daisy. Among other plants called daisy, yellow daisy is a synonym for the black-eyed Susan; Michaelmas daisy, for an aster. The seaside daisy and daisy fleabane are species of the fleabane genus. Daisies are classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Asterales, family Asteraceae.

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"daisy." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"daisy." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 19, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/daisy

"daisy." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved August 19, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/daisy

daisy

dai·sy / ˈdāzē/ • n. (pl. -ies) a small grassland plant (family Compositae) that has flowers with a yellow disk and white rays. It has given rise to many ornamental garden varieties. PHRASES: (as) fresh as a daisy healthy and full of energy. pushing up (the) daisies inf. dead and buried. ORIGIN: Old English dæges ēage ‘day's eye.’

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"daisy." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"daisy." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 19, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/daisy-1

"daisy." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 19, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/daisy-1

daisy

daisy the white-petalled, yellow-centred flowers of this plant are associated with spring (as in the proverb it is not spring until you can plant your foot upon twelve daisies). In informal use (chiefly US) a daisy is something regarded as first-rate or charming.
daisy chain a string of daisies threaded together by their stems; in figurative usage, a series of associated or connected people or things.

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"daisy." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"daisy." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 19, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/daisy

"daisy." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved August 19, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/daisy

daisy

daisy Any of several members of the family Asteraceae/Compositae, especially the common English garden daisy, Bellis perennis. It has basal leaves and long stalks bearing solitary flower heads, each of which has a large, yellow, central disc and small radiating white petal-like florets.

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"daisy." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"daisy." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 19, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/daisy

"daisy." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved August 19, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/daisy

daisy

daisy OE. dæġes ēaġe ‘day's eye’; so named from its covering the yellow disc in the evening and disclosing it in the morning.

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"daisy." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"daisy." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 19, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/daisy-2

"daisy." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved August 19, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/daisy-2

daisy

daisy See BELLIS.

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"daisy." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"daisy." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 19, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/daisy

"daisy." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Retrieved August 19, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/daisy

daisy

daisyjazzy, snazzy •palsy-walsy • Ramsay •pansy, tansy •Anasazi, Ashkenazi, Ashkenazy, Benghazi, Ghazi, kamikaze, khazi, Stasi, Swazi •prezzie •frenzy, Mackenzie •Bel Paese, Buthelezi, crazy, daisy, Farnese, glazy, hazy, lazy, Maisie, mazy, oops-a-daisy, Piranesi, upsy-daisy, Veronese •stir-crazy •breezy, cheesy, easy, easy-peasy, Kesey, Parcheesi, queasy, sleazy, wheezy, Zambezi •teensy • speakeasy •busy, dizzy, fizzy, frizzy, Izzy, Lizzie, tizzy •flimsy, whimsy •Kinsey, Lindsay, Lynsey •poesy •Aussie, cossie, mossie •Swansea • gauzy • causey •ballsy, palsy •blowsy, Dalhousie, drowsy, frowzy, housey-housey, lousy •cosy (US cozy), dozy, Josie, mafiosi, mosey, nosy, posey, posy, prosy, Rosie, rosy •Boise, noisy

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"daisy." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"daisy." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 19, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/daisy-0

"daisy." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved August 19, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/daisy-0