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shoot / shoōt/ • v. (past shot / shät/ ) 1. [tr.] kill or wound (a person or animal) with a bullet or arrow: he was shot in the leg during an armed robbery| [tr.] troops shot dead 29 people. ∎  [intr.] fire a bullet from a gun or discharge an arrow from a bow: he shot at me twice the troops were ordered to shoot to kill | [tr.] they shot a volley of arrows into the village. ∎  cause (a gun) to fire. ∎  [tr.] damage or remove (something) with a bullet or missile: Guy, shoot their hats off. ∎  [intr.] hunt game with a gun: we go to Scotland to shoot every autumn. ∎  [intr.] (shoot over) shoot game over (an estate or other area of countryside). ∎  shoot game in or on (an estate, cover, etc.). 2. [intr.] move suddenly and rapidly in a particular direction: the car shot forward Ward's hand shot out, grabbing his arm. ∎  [tr.] cause to move suddenly and rapidly in a particular direction: he would have fallen if Marc hadn't shot out a hand to stop him Beauchamp shot United into the lead. ∎  [tr.] direct (a glance, question, or remark) at someone: Luke shot her a quick glance | [with direct speech] “I can't believe what I'm hearing,” she shot back. ∎  [intr.] used to invite a comment or question: “May I just ask you one more question?” “Shoot.” ∎  (of a pain) move with a sharp stabbing sensation: Claudia felt a shaft of pain shoot through her chest | fig. a pang of regret shot through her. ∎  [tr.] (of a boat) sweep swiftly down or under (rapids, a waterfall, or a bridge). ∎  [tr.] inf. (of a motor vehicle) pass (a traffic light at red). ∎  extend sharply in a particular direction: a road that seemed to just shoot upward at a terrifying angle. ∎  [tr.] move (a door bolt) to fasten or unfasten a door. 3. [intr.] (in soccer, hockey, basketball, etc.) kick, hit, or throw the ball or puck in an attempt to score a goal: Williams twice shot wide | [tr.] after school, we'd go straight out in the alley to shoot baskets. ∎  [tr.] inf. make (a specified score) for a round of golf: in the second round he shot a 65. ∎  [tr.] inf. play a game of (pool or dice). 4. [tr.] film or photograph (a scene, film, etc.): she has just been commissioned to shoot a video| [intr.] point the camera and just shoot—nothing could be easier. 5. [intr.] (of a plant or seed) send out buds or shoots; germinate. ∎  (of a bud or shoot) appear; sprout. 6. [tr.] inf. inject oneself or another person with (a narcotic drug): he shot dope into his arm. 7. [tr.] plane (the edge of a board) accurately. • n. 1. a young branch or sucker springing from the main stock of a tree or other plant: he nipped off the new shoots that grew where the leaves joined the stems. 2. an occasion when a group of people hunt and shoot game for sport: a grouse shoot. ∎  a shooting match or contest: activities include a weekly rifle shoot. 3. an occasion when a professional photographer takes photographs or when a film or video is being made: a photo shoot a fashion shoot. 4. variant spelling of chute1 . 5. a rapid in a stream: follow the portages that skirt all nine shoots of whitewater. • interj. inf. used as a euphemism for ‘shit’: shoot, it was a great day to be alive. PHRASES: have shot one's boltsee bolt1 . shoot the breeze (or the bull) inf. have a casual conversation. shoot one's cuffs pull one's shirt cuffs out to project beyond the cuffs of one's jacket or coat. shoot from the hip inf. react suddenly or without careful consideration of one's words or actions. shoot oneself in the foot inf. inadvertently make a situation worse for oneself. shoot it out inf. engage in a decisive confrontation, typically a gun battle. shoot one's mouth off inf. talk boastfully or indiscreetly.PHRASAL VERBS: shoot someone/something down kill or wound someone by shooting them, esp. in a ruthless way: troops shot down 28 demonstrators. ∎  bring down an aircraft, missile, or pilot by shooting at it. ∎ fig. crush someone or their opinions by forceful criticism or argument: she tried to argue and got shot down in flames for her trouble. shoot through Austral./NZ, inf. leave, typically to escape from or avoid someone or something: me wife's shot through and I can't pay the rent. shoot up 1. (esp. of a child) grow taller rapidly: when she hit thirteen she shot up to a startling 5 foot 9. ∎  (of a price or amount) rise suddenly. 2. see shoot someone/something up (sense 2) below. shoot someone/something up 1. cause great damage to something by shooting; kill or wound someone by shooting: the police shot up our building. 2. (also shoot up) inf. inject a narcotic drug; inject someone with a narcotic drug: she went home and shot up alone in her room I was shooting up cocaine. shoot people up with the new chemical and see what happens. DERIVATIVES: shoot·a·ble adj. ORIGIN: Old English scēotan, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch scieten and German schiessen, also to sheet1 , shot1 , and shut.

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"shoot." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 Nov. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"shoot." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 25, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/shoot-1

"shoot." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved November 25, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/shoot-1

shoot

shoot pt., pp. shot go swiftly and suddenly; send forth (spec. missiles); wound or kill with a shot. OE. str. vb. sċētan = OS. skietan (Du. schieten), OHG. sciozzan (G. schiessen), ON. skjǒta :- Gmc. *skeutan, f. *skeut- *skaut- *skut-.
Hence sb. act of shooting XVI; sloping channel or conduit (cf. SHUTE) XIX.

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"shoot." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 Nov. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"shoot." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 25, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/shoot-2

"shoot." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved November 25, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/shoot-2

shoot

shoot shoot oneself in the foot inadvertently make a situation worse for oneself.
shoot something down in flames forcefully destroy an argument or proposal. From the literal sense of shooting at an aircraft to cause it to burst into flames and crash.

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"shoot." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 Nov. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"shoot." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 25, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/shoot

"shoot." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved November 25, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/shoot

shoot

shoot The aerial part of a vascular plant. It develops from the plumule and consists of a stem supporting leaves, buds, and flowers.

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"shoot." A Dictionary of Biology. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 Nov. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"shoot." A Dictionary of Biology. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 25, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/shoot-0

"shoot." A Dictionary of Biology. . Retrieved November 25, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/shoot-0

shoot

shoot A stem that is mainly above ground.

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"shoot." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 Nov. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"shoot." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 25, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/shoot

"shoot." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Retrieved November 25, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/shoot

shoot

shootacute, argute, astute, beaut, Beirut, boot, bruit, brut, brute, Bute, butte, Canute, cheroot, chute, commute, compute, confute, coot, cute, depute, dilute, dispute, flute, fruit, galoot, hoot, impute, jute, loot, lute, minute, moot, mute, newt, outshoot, permute, pollute, pursuit, recruit, refute, repute, root, route, salute, Salyut, scoot, shoot, Shute, sloot, snoot, subacute, suit, telecommute, Tonton Macoute, toot, transmute, undershoot, uproot, Ute, volute •Paiute • jackboot • freeboot • top boot •snow boot • gumboot • marabout •statute • bandicoot • Hakluyt •archlute • absolute • dissolute •irresolute, resolute •jackfruit • passion fruit • breadfruit •grapefruit • snakeroot • beetroot •arrowroot • autoroute

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"shoot." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 Nov. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"shoot." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 25, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/shoot-0

"shoot." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved November 25, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/shoot-0