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duck

duck, common name for wild and domestic waterfowl of the family Anatidae, which also includes geese and swans. It is hunted and bred for its meat, eggs, and feathers. Strictly speaking, duck refers to the female and drake to the male. Ducks are usually divided into three groups: the surface-feeding ducks—such as the mallard, wood duck, black duck, and teal—which frequent ponds, marshes, and other quiet waters; the diving ducks—such as the canvasback, scaup, scoter, eider, and redhead—found on bays, rivers, and lakes; and the fish-eating ducks, the mergansers, with slender, serrated bills, which also prefer open water. The surface feeders take wing straight up, while the divers patter along the water's surface in taking off. Ducks make long migratory flights. At the time of the postnuptial molt, the power of flight is temporarily lost, and most of the Northern Hemisphere drakes assume "eclipse" plumage similar to that of the female. The ancestor of all domestic breeds (see poultry), except the Muscovy of South American origin, is the mallard, Anas boscas, which is found in Europe, Asia, and North America. In the mallard drake a white ring separates the bright-green head and neck from the chestnut breast, the back is grayish brown, the tail white, and the wings have blue patches. The wood duck, Aix sponsa, smaller than the mallard, nests in hollow trees; the drake is a varicolored, iridescent ornament to lakes and ponds. The blue-winged, green-winged, and European teals (genus Querquedula) are small ducks that fly with great speed. The canvasback, Fuligula vallisneria, is hunted widely for its palatable flesh. It has a chestnut head and neck, black bill and chest, and whitish back and underparts. A swift flier, it is also an expert swimmer and diver. It breeds from the Dakotas and Minnesota north and winters on the coastal waters along the entire continent. In northern countries a portion of the down with which the eider ducks line their nests is systematically collected, as are some of the eggs; since the eiders lay throughout the season, these are soon replaced. The mergansers, genus Mergus, also called sheldrakes or sawbills, are usually crested. They include the goosander and the smaller red-breasted merganser, both circumpolar in distribution, and the North American hooded merganser, similar to the Old World smew. Because their fish diet gives their flesh a rank taste, they are called by sportsmen "trash ducks." Ducks are classified in the phylum Chordata, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Anseriformes, family Anatidae.

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"duck." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"duck." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved July 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/duck

duck

duck1 / dək/ • n. (pl. same or ducks ) 1. a waterbird with a broad blunt bill, short legs, webbed feet, and a waddling gait. The duck family (Anatidae) also includes geese and swans, from which ducks are distinguished by their generally smaller size and shorter necks. ∎  the female of such a bird. Contrasted with drake1 . ∎  such a bird as food. 2. a pure white thin-shelled bivalve mollusk (genus Anatina, family Mactridae) found off the Atlantic coasts of America. 3. another term for DUKW. PHRASES: get (or have) one's ducks in a row get (or have) one's facts straight; get (or have) everything organized. take to something like a duck to water take to something very readily: he took to the trumpet like a duck to water. water off a duck's back a potentially hurtful or harmful remark or incident that has no apparent effect on the person mentioned. duck2 • v. 1. [intr.] lower the head or the body quickly to avoid a blow or so as not to be seen: spectators ducked for cover she ducked into the doorway to get out of the line of fire | [tr.] he ducked his head and entered. ∎  (duck out) depart quickly: I thought I saw you duck out. ∎  [tr.] avoid (a blow) by moving down quickly: he ducked a punch from an angry first baseman. ∎  [tr.] inf. evade or avoid (an unwelcome duty or undertaking): a responsibility which a less courageous man might well have ducked | [intr.] I was engaged twice and ducked out both times. 2. [intr.] plunge one's head or body under water briefly: I had to keep ducking down to get my head cool. 3. Bridge refrain from playing a winning card on a particular trick for tactical reasons. • n. [in sing.] a quick lowering of the head. DERIVATIVES: duck·er n. duck3 (also ducks) • n. Brit. dear; darling (used as an informal or affectionate form of address, esp. among cockneys). duck4 • n. a strong untwilled linen or cotton fabric, used chiefly for casual or work clothes and sails. ∎  (ducks) pants made of such a fabric. duck5 • n. Cricket a batsman's score of zero: out for a duck.

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"duck." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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duck

duck Worldwide waterfowl, related to the swan and goose. Most nest in cool areas and migrate to warm areas in winter. All have large bills, short legs and webbed feet. Their colour is varied, and dense plumage is underlaid by down and waterproof feathers. There are two groups: dabbling ducks, which feed from the surface, and diving ducks. All eat seeds, insects, crustacea and molluscs. Most engage in complex courtship, and lay a large clutch of eggs. There are seven tribes: eiders, shelducks, dabbling ducks, perching ducks, pochards, sea ducks and stiff-tailed ducks. There are c.200 species. Length: 30–60cm (1–2ft); weight: to 7.2kg (16lb). Family Anatidae.

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duck

duck Wild duck or wildfowl; Anas spp.; mallard is A. platyrhynchos. A 150‐g portion is a rich source of protein, vitamins B1, B2, B12, niacin, and copper; a good source of iron and zinc; a source of vitamin B6; contains 15 g of fat, of which one‐third is saturated; supplies 200 kcal (840 kJ).

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"duck." A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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duck

duck 2 plunge into liquid, trans. and intr. XIV; stoop quickly XVI. ME. douke, dūke, repr. OE. *dūcan = MLG., MDu. dūken (Du. duiken), OHG. tūhhan (G. tauchen), corr. to forms with a short vowel in MHG. tücken stoop quickly, G. ducken (with LG. initial cons.). The short vowel is evidenced XVI.

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"duck." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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duck

duck2 duck and cover in the US, take action to protect oneself from danger, especially where such action is likely to prove completely inadequate; with reference to a civil-defence slogan used in the US c.1950.
duck and dive use one's ingenuity to deal with or evade a situation.

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duck

duck 1 swimming bird of the family Anatidae. OE. dū́ce, f. base of dūcan dive, DUCK 2. The ME. vars. duk(ke), dōke, douke, point to orig. variation in the quantity of the stem-vowel.

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duck

duck 3 strong untwilled fabric XVII; pl. trousers or a suit of this XIX. — (M)Du. doek linen = OS. dōk, OHG. tuoh (G. tuch), of unkn. orig.

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duck

duck1 in cricket, a batsman's score of nought. From a shortening of duck's egg, used for the figure 0 because of its similar outline.

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duck

duckbuck, Canuck, chuck, cluck, cruck, duck, fuck, luck, muck, pluck, puck, ruck, schmuck, shuck, struck, stuck, suck, truck, tuck, upchuck, yuck •blackbuck • reedbuck • sawbuck •roebuck • bushbuck • megabuck •woodchuck • shelduck • Habakkuk •stagestruck • awestruck • moonstruck •dumbstruck • thunderstruck

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"duck." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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