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Tombstone

TOMBSTONE


TOMBSTONE. A former silver boomtown located east of the San Pedro River valley in southeastern Arizona, Tombstone is some twenty-five miles north of the Mexican border. Prospector Ed Schieffelin, who discovered silver nearby in 1877, named the site as he did because of remarks by soldiers at Camp Huachuca that the only thing he would find was his tombstone. Large-scale silver production began in 1880. The district yielded about $30 million over the next thirty years and about $8 million thereafter. Politics, feuds, greed, and conflicting town lot claims produced violence that culminated in the 26 October 1881 shootout near the O.K. Corral between the Earp brothers and Doc Holliday on one side and the Clantons and McLaurys on the other. Labor strife and flooding curtailed mining operations in the mid-1880s. Despite extensive efforts to pump water out of the underground shafts, nearly all the mines were abandoned by 1911. Tombstone's population declined from 5,300 in 1882 to 849 in 1930. In 1929 the Cochise County seat was moved from Tombstone to Bisbee. With the publication of Walter Noble Burns's Tombstone, an Iliad of the Southwest (1927) and Stuart Lake's Wyatt Earp, Frontier Marshal (1931), along with the institution of the town's first Hell-dorado Days celebration in 1929, Tombstone capitalized on its notoriety as The Town Too Tough to Die. Subsequent books, motion pictures, and television shows have enhanced its reputation as a place where legends of the Old West were played out. The town became a national historic landmark in 1962, and is a major tourist attraction. Its population was 1,504 in 2000.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Marks, Paula Mitchell. And Die in the West: The Story of the O.K. Corral Gunfight. New York: Morrow, 1989.

Shillingberg, William B. Tombstone, A.T.: A History of Early Mining, Milling, and Mayhem. Spokane, Wash.: Arthur H. Clark, 1999.

Bruce J.Dinges

Rufus KayWyllys

See alsoMining Towns ; Silver Prospecting and Mining .

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"Tombstone." Dictionary of American History. . Encyclopedia.com. 10 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Tombstone." Dictionary of American History. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 10, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tombstone

"Tombstone." Dictionary of American History. . Retrieved December 10, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tombstone

Tombstone

Tombstone, city (1990 pop. 1,220), Cochise co., SE Ariz.; inc. 1881. With its pleasant climate and legendary past, Tombstone is a well-known tourist attraction. The city became a national historic landmark in 1962. Silver was discovered there in 1877 by Ed Schieffelin, a prospector, who two years later laid out and named the city. Tombstone quickly became one of the richest and most lawless mining towns in the Southwest. Its newspaper, Epitaph, was first published in 1880. The city was county seat from 1881 to 1929. Large-scale mining ended by 1890. Among Tombstone's many picturesque landmarks are Boot Hill Graveyard, where many desperados are buried; Bird Cage Theater, now a museum; and O.K. Corral, scene of a climactic gun battle between the Clanton gang and Wyatt Earp, his brother Virgil, and Doc Holliday. The city's violent past is reenacted each year at the 3-day Helldorado celebrations. Nearby are the beautiful Dragoon Mts., onetime stronghold of the Native American chief Cochise.

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"Tombstone." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 10 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Tombstone." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 10, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/tombstone

"Tombstone." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved December 10, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/tombstone

tombstone

tomb·stone / ˈtoōmˌstōn/ • n. 1. a large, flat inscribed stone standing or laid over a grave. 2. (also tombstone advertisement or tombstone ad) an advertisement listing the underwriters or firms associated with a new issue of securities.

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"tombstone." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 10 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"tombstone." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 10, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tombstone-1

"tombstone." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved December 10, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tombstone-1

Tombstone

Tomb·stone / ˈtoōmˌstōn/ a historic frontier city in southeastern Arizona, the site of the 1881 gunfight at the O.K. Corral; pop. 1,220.

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"Tombstone." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 10 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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tombstone

tombstone. Vertical or horizontal inscribed grave-marker or memorial set up over a tomb.

Bibliography

Weaver (1915)

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"tombstone." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. 10 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"tombstone." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 10, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tombstone

"tombstone." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Retrieved December 10, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tombstone

tombstone

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"tombstone." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 10 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"tombstone." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved December 10, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tombstone