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Deadwood

Deadwood, city (1990 pop. 1,830), seat of Lawrence co., W S.Dak.; settled 1876 after discovery of gold. A Black Hills tourist center, it is also a trade hub for a lumbering, stock-raising, and mining region. Built in a narrow canyon, with houses climbing the steep sides, Deadwood Gulch (so called because its trees had been killed by fire) boomed and waned with the discovery and abandonment of nearby gold and silver mines. Its history is commemorated in the Adams Memorial Museum and an annual "Days of '76" celebration. The graves of Wild Bill Hickok (shot in a saloon here during a card game) and Calamity Jane are in Deadwood's "Boot Hill." Gambling casinos, legalized in 1989, now dominate Deadwood's economy.

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deadwood

dead·wood / ˈdedˌwoŏd/ • n. a branch or part of a tree that is dead. ∎ fig. people or things that are no longer useful or productive.

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