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Pikes Peak

PIKES PEAK

PIKES PEAK, standing 14,110 feet in the Rocky Mountains in El Paso County, Colorado, was first attempted in November 1806 by Lt. Zebulon M. Pike. Pike failed to summit because of heavy snow. Popular usage by trappers and others of the name "Pikes Peak" led to an official name. Pikes Peak is of historical significance as a landmark of early traders and trappers and as the name of the region now known as Colorado. The discovery of gold in 1858 brought large numbers to the region. Thousands who crossed the Plains with the slogan "Pikes Peak or Bust" opened up various mining camps near Pikes Peak or settled in the valleys of Colorado.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Hollon, Eugene W. The Lost Pathfinder: Zebulon Montgomery Pike. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1949.

Montgomery, M. R. Jefferson and the Gun-Men: How the West Was Almost Lost. New York: Crown Publishers, 2000.

Terrell, John Upton. Zebulon Pike: The Life and Times of an Adventurer. New York: Weybright and Talley, 1968.

Malcolm G.Wyer/h. s.

See alsoColorado ; Pikes Peak Gold Rush .

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"Pikes Peak." Dictionary of American History. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Pikes Peak

Pikes Peak, 14,110 ft (4,301 m) high, central Colo., in the Front Range of the Rocky Mts.; discovered by U.S. explorer Zebulon Pike in 1806. There are many higher peaks in the Rockies, but this is the best known and most conspicuous because of its location on the edge of the Great Plains. At its eastern base is Colorado Springs; to the north is Denver. Its summit, generally snow covered, is reached by a cog railroad and a highway.

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"Pikes Peak." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Pikes Peak." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/pikes-peak

"Pikes Peak." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved October 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/pikes-peak