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Limoges

Limoges (lēmôzh´), city (1990 pop. 136,407), capital of Haute-Vienne dept., W central France, on the Vienne River. It is famous for its ceramics industry, which uses the abundant kaolin in the area; the city's porcelain workshops employ more than 10,000 people. The shoe industry is also large. Uranium is mined, and automobiles and electrical equipment are manufactured. An ancient town, Limoges became (12th cent.) the seat of the viscounty of Limoges and (1589) the capital of Limousin prov. It was often visited by war, pestilence, and famine. Richard Coeur de Lion (Richard I of England) was killed in battle near Limoges (1199). In 1370, Edward the Black Prince burned the city and massacred its inhabitants. The famous Limoges enamel industry was fully developed by the 13th cent. and culminated in the work of Léonard Limousin, but it declined when Limoges was once more devastated in the Wars of Religion. Turgot, who was intendant from 1761 to 1764, brought back prosperity by introducing (1771) the china manufactures. Limoges has a cathedral (chiefly 13th–16th cent.), a notable ceramics museum, and an art gallery containing many works by Renoir, who was born there. Limoges Univ. is there.

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"Limoges." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Limoges." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved May 25, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/limoges

Limoges

Limoges City on the River Vienne; capital of Haute-Vienne department, w central France. A Roman settlement, it was later a tribal capital of the Gauls. In 1199, Richard I (the Lionheart) died in battle on the city outskirts. In 1370, Edward the Black Prince sacked the city. Its enamel industry culminated in the 16th-century craftsmanship of Léonard Limousin, but was devastated by the Thirty Years' War. In the late 18th century, porcelain manufacturing flourished once more. Since 1945, the exploitation of its uranium mines encouraged economic expansion. Pop. (1999) 137,502.

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"Limoges." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Limoges." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 25, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/limoges

"Limoges." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved May 25, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/limoges

Limoges

LimogesLimoges, loge, Vosges

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"Limoges." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Limoges." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 25, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/limoges

"Limoges." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved May 25, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/limoges