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Boston (borough, England)

Boston, borough and district (1991 pop. 26,495), E central England, on the Witham River. Boston's fame as a port dates from the 13th cent., when it was a Hanseatic port trading wool and wine. Having recovered from a decline in the 18th and 19th cent. caused by silting, Boston now exports coal, grain, agricultural machinery, potatoes, and cattle; it imports timber, grain, fruit, vegetables, and fertilizers. It is also a shellfishery center and a market for a rich lowland farm area. There are food-processing plants and other light industries.

Puritans under John Cotton sailed in 1633 from Boston to Massachusetts Bay (renamed Boston). St. Botolph's Church is on the site of a 7th-century monastery, founded by St. Botolph, for whom Boston is named (Botolph's tun, or town). The 288-ft (88-m) tower (called the Stump, because it does not come to a point) is a landmark. The guildhall, begun in 1545, was restored in 1911 and is now a museum.

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"Boston (borough, England)." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Boston (borough, England)." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved August 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/boston-borough-england

Boston

Boston, on the river Witham in Lincolnshire, was once one of the greatest English ports. It became a town only after 1066, but rapidly flourished by exporting wool. In the 13th cent. it paid more tax than any port except London, and was home to one of England's international fairs. It declined in the 15th cent., but was still enough of a port to send emigrants to America in 1630, giving its name to the state capital of Massachusetts. It is still dominated by the medieval church of St Botolph (‘Boston stump’) with its 272-foot tower, ‘the most prodigious of English parochial steeples’ (Pevsner).

David M. Palliser

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"Boston." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Boston." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/boston-0

"Boston." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Retrieved August 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/boston-0

Boston

Boston a town in Lincolnshire, for which was named the state capital of Massachusetts, founded c.1630, known for its social exclusivity (see also Brahmin).
Boston Stump an informal name for the church tower of Boston, Lincolnshire, perhaps because, although lofty and a conspicuous sea-mark, it has no spire.
Boston Tea Party a violent demonstration in 1773 by American colonists prior to the War of American Independence. Colonists boarded vessels in Boston harbour and threw the cargoes of tea into the water in protest at the imposition of a tax on tea by the British Parliament, in which the colonists had no representation.

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"Boston." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Boston." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved August 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/boston